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review 2019-02-22 08:20
A decade after a friend’s suicide, memories and the past are dissected to get to the truth behind ‘The Lost Night’
The Lost Night - Andrea Bartz

When Lindsay lost her best friend Edie to suicide in 2009, she was amidst a haze of partying, hanging out in a hipster community in Brooklyn, living it up with drugs, alcohol, and forgotten nights. A decade later brings a reunion with an old friend from that whiskey-and-Molly-soaked era, Sarah, and memories and questions about their friend’s death surface.

Lindsay begins a fully-fledged investigation into her own past as well as of many friends who shared those wild days and wilder nights. Delving into the past by muddling through barriers to obsolete technology, getting access to police case files, and often awkwardly questioning people she’d soon forget, Lindsay becomes completely obsessed with Edie’s death and the night she can’t remember. Her memories play tricks on her and some have vanished; a testament to how many years were wasted in what seemed like the ‘best of times’ when they were happening. Her research become all-absorbing, intense and obsessive.

 

This novel explores more than just a death that left countless questions behind and friends and family grieving. It explores the complexities of memory, the psyche, the fragile frivolous relationships that are borne out of a life fueled by chemicals. The excellent writing by Andrea Bartz pulls you along Lindsay’s painful trail through the past, unraveling a mystery that proves to be as compulsive and gripping as it is disturbing and twisted. Bartz writes every word with absolute intent, creating a different atmosphere and tonality with each situation that arises and with other key players’ perspectives.

 

It even brought up emotions in me that were often difficult to juggle while reading, as I recalled questions I still have surrounding a sudden death of someone close to me, as well as the discomfort of my own fair share of stupid drunken nights in my twenties.

It highlights the recklessness and stupidity of the kinds of choices made when you’re young and you feel like you have the whole world at your feet. And this blast from the past, the window into New York at that time, even though it’s just a microcosm, comes across as both vivid and surreal at the same time.

 

This is the perfect read for anyone who loves a good psychological thriller or mystery that pokes around in the recesses of the mind, while questioning the past. The past behaviors and self-absorbed nature of the characters may be jarring to some people, but I found it to be eye-opening and thus made for riveting reading. Getting to the truth and having Lindsay get some closure to her friend’s death had me hooked entirely.

One of my fastest reads in weeks, this was an all-absorbing and exciting read; thank you to Crown Publishing for sending me this advance reader’s copy.

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/35955191-the-lost-night
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review 2016-05-23 01:06
Harvard Drama
Bradstreet Gate: A Novel - Robin Kirman

Bradstreet Gate by Robin Kirman was a nice change of character writing from the other books I have read recently. Each character allowed us to go back into past and navigate through their current situations without giving too much away or having a nice bow tied at the end. I know a lot of readers do not want a left open ending, but I for one do not mind being led to an open door of possibilities of what might have happened at the end.

 

Charlie, Georgia, and Alice meet at Harvard and all come from very different backgrounds.  Charlie strives to be like his favorite professor, Storrow, while Georgia, his secret crush, is sleeping with Storrow. The only issue is that Alice finds out all the juicy details on her own during a very important time their senior year when a fellow classmate is found dead. 

 

Kirman takes you through loops and swirls of their tainted relationships all the while the characters are trying to figure out who they are even 10 years since graduation. 

 

If you want a happy ending, don't read this book. Because it is left up to the imagination. But if you want a very well-written novel that has character profile's exquisitely thought out, then please read Bradstreet Gate

 

I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review.

 

 

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review 2016-03-13 22:25
Sex, Lies, Drugs, and Rock&Roll
Liar: A Memoir - Rob Roberge

Liar by Rob Roberge is eye-opening and inspiring. This memoir has perhaps allowed me to better understand my own father who, being a drug addict/alcoholic and probably partaking in half of the stories Roberge details in the memoir on his own, has their own list of issues and disturbances.

 

Roberge describes every detail, one year to the next and then back again, making the reader feel as if it is their mind is turning into scrambled eggs. The way the memoir is written is probably my favorite. You are the one in each scene; feeling Roberge's excitement- it is your excitement. Feeling his sadness, suicidal thoughts, or even his mania- it is your sadness, suicidal thoughts, YOUR mania.

 

Liar is so put together that you wonder if this author is really the man that he portrays in the book; but then again, even the most manic person just needs to concentrate on their thoughts and would be able to write it all down and print it for the world. That's exactly what Rob Roberge did.

 

This book will make you look at your own life and ask yourself who you are, and what the world would sound like without you in it...

 

I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review.

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text 2015-06-25 16:28
Reading progress update: I've read 43%.
The Little Paris Bookshop: A Novel - Nina George,Simon Pare

I listened to this for hours yesterday using the read-to-me function on my Fire HDX. The shop owner, all the life lessons, flashbacks and the writer make this such an enjoyable read. I had no idea I was going to like it as much as I do.

 

*Monsieur Jean Perdu (Literary Apothecary)

*Catherine (neighbor)

*Manon (love of his life)

*Max Jordon (author)

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review 2014-12-26 19:50
Along the lines of a Da Vinci Code mystery

The Secrets of Life and Death by Rebecca Alexander is the female author version of Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code or any of his other amazing novels. 

I thoroughly enjoyed the character change with every chapter, much like how my previous review copy of The Good Suicides was organized. I think that it makes for a much better flow of information than perhaps a character change mid-chapter. Although sometimes that mid-chapter lane change is needed, it can get tiring throughout a novel. 

Professor Felix Guichard is involved in solving an interesting death of a young lady whom has symbols engraved in her skin. Professor Guichard believes they are linked back to Dr John Dee, the Elizabethan Alchemist and Occultist in Krakow.

This was a quick read and easy to understand; just in case you have had a previous issue with language and history from Brown's novels. Occult has always been a very interesting topic to write/read about both in fiction and non-fiction. Alexander goes into detail and I could feel exactly what the character was going through during the read. 

 

Link to Amazon is below for purchase!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Life-Death-Rebecca-Alexander/dp/0804140685 

 

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

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