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Search tags: Rebecca-Skloot
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review 2018-09-05 00:00
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot "She's the most important person in the world and her family living in poverty. If our mother is so important to science, why can't we get health insurance?"

Both fascinating and enraging.
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review 2017-12-02 13:00
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot

I've got a little review for you today, though the review is small, I have a large love of this book! There are just some books where I can't exactly put my thoughts properly on paper.

 

...

 

I am forever changed from reading this book. It is beyond a doubt one of the most fascinating book I have ever read. I found this to be heartbreaking, I cried during several parts.

 

This is something that I never knew about before I read this and I am so shocked I did not even have vague knowledge of Henrietta Lacks and what her cells (HeLa) have done.

 

I believe this book should be required reading in schools and for anyone who is even remotely connected to the science or medical field. Even if you are not connected to those fields, this is a must read book.

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review 2017-10-07 03:25
The Immortal Live of Henrietta Lacks
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot

Henrietta Lacks was an amazing woman who was unknown. Because of her, life saving changes happened. And, yes, lots of money was made too. This highlighted issues with medical ethics and consent. I'm so glad this book exists. It tells an important story. I liked how it was laid out. Not dry, boring like it could have been. Sad that her daughter, Deborah, didn't live to see it's publication. 
On a personal note, in 2016, I had to have part of my liver removed because of a large tumor (not cancer). I did sign a consent form saying it was okay for the University of Washington hospital to do research on that tumor and tissue. I do think it's, in part, due to people like Henrietta, that I was able to give consent and not have them just take it and not know that they did.

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review 2017-06-27 00:00
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: TV Tie-In
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: TV... The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: TV Tie-In - Rebecca Skloot This is a very interesting book. The science is fascinating, as are the human stories at its heart.

There are so many tragic aspects to this story including Henrietta's painful death, Elsie's separation from her family and her life after that and the Lacks family not being able to afford health care when their mother/grandmother contributed so much to modern medicine.

I can't also help but think that what set of this chain of events was Henrietta's marginalised position. I wonder if these events would have happened if Henrietta was a white woman. Is it ethically right to use tissue samples and research results when they may have been unethically obtained.

I think the saddest thing is that if someone had asked Henrietta and her family if they would be happy to donate their tissues and be an important and invaluable part of medical research, they probably would have said yes.
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review 2017-06-04 00:00
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot I starting reading this without knowing what it was about, and it's a real doozy. It's about a woman who's cells are responsible for much of our medicines and medical knowledge of today. I guess the topic is bioethics. Her background and the life of her family after her death are given. There's so much moral conflict surround their situation and no clear cut answers for these situations going forward. The author does a great job of showing all sides of the matter. Very interesting and thought provoking. I liked learning about the people involved, putting the human elements into the equation.
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