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review 2018-08-06 14:10
A Duke in the Night (The Devils of Dover) - Kelly Bowen

This book took me some time to get through. I don’t think it was the book, or the plot, though, I think it was just life being busy. The plot was entertaining and the characters were good. The conflict was entertaining, too. However, the characters don’t pop off the page and the emotional tension was good, but there was something that it missed that when it came to work and life, this one didn’t drown it out. Some books, it doesn’t matter what is going on in life, I have to keep reading and this one seemed to lack that. I was fine with setting it aside to do other things. Did I enjoy the book, yes. Will I read book 2 real soon, definitely. Did I like the two main characters, for sure. It was good but there was something with the plot that didn't grab and hold me the whole time.

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review 2018-06-22 22:20
Das Fünfte Zeichen // The Devil's Star!!!
Das fünfte Zeichen - Jo Nesbø

German and english review
First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.

 

Diesmal nur eine kurze und vor allem spoilerfreie Bewertung.

 

 

Ich bin so unheimlich froh, dass ich das Buch jetzt endlich hinter mir habe, dass liegt nicht an dem Buch an sich, sondern an einer besonderen Storyline, wenn ihr die Bücher lest, wisst ihr sicher was ich meine, wenn nicht, dann will ich nichts verraten. Aber es ist endlich überstanden, jetzt hab ich das Gefühl, dass ich irgendwie viel frischer in den Rest der Serie starten kann.

 

Den Fall fand ich wirklich richtig gut erzählt und auch wirklich spannend bis zum Schluss. Ich hatte zwar einen Verdacht, aber wie immer hab ich den zur Seite geschoben und am Ende war ich dem Ganzen doch näher als gedacht.

 

Am besten hat mich die Auflösung von der ein oder anderen Storyline gefallen, die in vorherigen Büchern schon angefangen wurde. Ihr wisst was ich meine. Ich dachte erst wir würden nicht sehr viel von Rakel und Oleg sehen, aber war froh, wie sich das im Laufe des Buches entwickelt hat. Es ist nicht wirklich ein Spoiler aber trotzdem VORSICHT: Der Moment in dem Oleg zu Harry Papa gesagt hat, hat bei mir für alle möglichen Gefühle gesorgt und obwohl die Situation angespannt war, hat es mich grinsen lassen wie ein totaler Idiot.

 

***

 

This time around it's just going to be a short and spoiler free review.

 

I'm just so very happy that I am finally done with this book, it's not about the book itself but one of the storylines. If you read the book, you know what I mean. If you haven't read it, I won't spoil anything. But I did it. It's finally done. Now I have the feeling that I can somehow start fresh and new into the rest of the series.

 

The case itself was really damn well told and kept me guessing until the very end. I can't say I never had a feeling but I always push it aside and at the end of it all, I always come pretty close.

 

What I loved the most, was that storylines from the books before were being wrapped up. You know what I mean. After the beginning, I didn't expect to see anything from Rakel and Oleg but I was so so SO happy how things developed throughout the book. It's not really that much of a spoiler but well, SPOILER, the moment when Oleg calls Harry dad, made me feel all the feels and even though the situation was super tense, I kept smiling like a total idiot.

 
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review 2018-04-15 03:16
Out in June
City of Devils - Paul French City of Devils - Paul French

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley

 

                Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom opens in 1935 at a club in the city of Shanghai.  Jones is going to met a gangster, and, of course, the shit hits the fan.  It is a Hollywood version of what Shanghai was like during the interwar years. Yet, there is some truth to it.  The city did have Badlands, and there were clubs that not only hired but catered to expatriates from America and Europe.  In his book City of Devils, Paul French presents the truth and while it does involve show girls there is a great more drugs, murder, and the looming threat of war.

 

                French details Shanghai, in particular Joe Farren and Jack Riley, two men who were sometimes engaged in legal business and sometimes in not so legal business.  Joe Farren started as a Fred Astaire or Vernon Castle type.  Escaping Vienna and touring Asia with his wife and the dance troupe they eventually started.  Farren is the dapper man, the married man with his wife Nellie.  He does resemble, at least in French’s description. 

 

                Riley is more of a gangster type.  American, blunt, and physical as opposed to dapper.  But not stupid, not stupid at all. His washing up at Shanghai isn’t so much to do with his performance ability. The two men are sometimes partners, sometimes rivals, sometimes enemies.

 

                In the story of the rise and fall of the two men, French also describes the imploding of Shanghai as an international colony forced upon the Chinese as well as the coming Second World War.  It isn’t just crime that causes the problems but also the Japanese and the shifting of power.

 

                At points, French introduces newspaper columns and Chinese views on what is occurring – either the view of the white men or the invading Japanese.  It is those bits that are the most moving and wonderful because they move the book beyond a simple history of the underworld.

 

                French writes with passion and vigor.  His prose is quite engrossing, and he does the best he can with limited sources.  What is most interesting (and hardy lest surprising) is that the women were harder to trace than the men.  It is to French’s credit that he shows the women as more than just molls or enablers.  In fact, a few of them are movers and shakers.

 

                The book is both engaging and engrossing.

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review 2018-03-01 20:14
The Devil's Colony - Bill Schweigart
The Devil's Colony - Bill Schweigart

In a trilogy pertaining to cryptid monsters, I find it fitting that the final book in the series centers around the most horrible monster of all - man. The evil that man has inflicted on each other is astounding to think about. Hatred and bigotry come front and center in Schweigart's The Devil's Colony. Ben and Lindsay are once again called on by billionaire cryptozoologist, Richard Severance. This time, it's to infiltrate the compound of neo-nazi Henry Drexler. Henry is the son of a former Nazi SS officer and scientist who was assigned by Hitler to find proof of the dominance and superiority of the Aryan race throughout history. Now Henry is using his family's fortune and remote camp location in the Pine Barrens Woods of New Jersey to welcome all neo-Nazis and white supremacists who want to join him in continuing his father's dream. But what else has Henry unearthed in his research of his father's past?

 

The Devil's Colony is different than the previous two entries in the trilogy. The first two, The Beast of Barcroft and Northwoods centers around the cryptid monsters that are unleashed and causing havoc. In The Devil's Colony, the story focuses mainly on the horror's of man and the cryptid monster is a side dish to come in during the last act. According to some reviews I've read, this difference may have tripped up a reader or two. However, it didn't spoil the story for me. I enjoyed Schweigart's tale and thought it hit many of the right notes. Perhaps, the cryptid portion of the story could've been sprinkled a little more throughout so that it didn't seem like two different stories trying to be mashed together. All in all, I enjoyed the trilogy and look forward to more from Bill.

 

 


4 Nazi SS Swords out of 5

 

 


You can also follow my reviews at the following links:

 

https://intothemacabre.com

 

http://intothemacabre.booklikes.com

 

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5919799-ken-mckinley

 

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text 2018-02-01 00:56
January in Review

January in Review

(Read: 5 / Reviewed: 9)

It's certainly been an interesting, if not a long, month! Phew, I thought January would never end! Fortunately I got through some great books and was able to write two reviews each week. This new routine really helped me stay on top of things. Let's take a look at all the bookish goodness, shall we?

Read

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Splatterpunk Fighting Back by (multiple) - This analogy has eleven individual stories written by different authors. Going in, I was only vaguely familiar with Duncan Ralston, having previously finished Woom. I never would've discovered this had it not been for Horror Aficionados on Goodreads, of who appointed it the January group read with author invite. I was lucky enough to ask some of the authors questions whilst trying to gain more insight into their brutal tales, and I had a blast! The best thing, though? All proceeds of this book go to charity! (Rated: 4/5)

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay - Another one I wouldn't have picked up if not for the Horror Aficionados group. Being the January group read, I was pleasantly surprised by this one! (Rated: 4/5)

The Darkest Torment by Gena Showalter - I started this long-running series in 2011, and it's still ongoing. Whilst I really enjoyed it at the beginning, my enjoyment waned several instalments ago, however I can't just give up without finishing it, can I? Ludicrous! (Rated: 2/5)

What Hides Within by Jason Parent - I found this on Netgalley, and I'm glad I did! Bloodshot Books accepted my request, and I promptly read and reviewed it. (Rated: 4/5)

Morium by S.J. Hermann - I was requested to read and review this novel by the author. Being my last read of January, this one takes priority and will be the first review of February. See my request information here. (Rated: 3/5)

 

Reviewed 

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Blood Song by Cat Adams (WORST READ)
Lockdown by Alexander Gordon Smith
The Taste of Night by Vicki Pettersson
Stephen by Amy Cross
The Devil’s Work by Mark Edwards
Blood Moon by Graeme Reynolds (BEST READ)
Woom by Duncan Ralston
What Hides Within by Jason Parent
Dark Space by Kevis Hendrickson

Other than that, January was a decent month for me personally. I'm enjoying reading more, getting out more, and generally trying to put more effort into my day-to-day life. I thank everyone who made this past month all the better, including the wonderful authors I had the chance to speak to! Here's hoping for a book-tastic February!

Red xx

Source: redlace.reviews/2018/01/31/january-in-review
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