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review 2017-11-13 06:36
Bog Bodies Uncovered by Miranda Aldhouse-Green
Bog Bodies Uncovered: Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery - Miranda Aldhouse-Green

TITLE:  Bog Bodies Uncovered:  Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery

 

AUTHOR:  Miranda Aldhouse-Green 

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2015

 

FORMAT: e-book

 

ISBN-13:  978-0-500-05182-5

 

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Miranda Aldhouse-Green takes a look at the mystery of the bog bodies:  how and where they were discovered; the world the bog people lived in; crime scene investigation of the bodies, how bog environments preserve bodies; whether the bog bodies were accident execution or murder victims; the ways they were killed; who might have done the deeds; and why this was done. 

 

The book is interesting and informative, with a great deal of research/references and many photographs.  However, there is also a great deal of speculation, repetition and no definitive answers.  In short, we don't know much about the bog bodies other than the manner of their deaths, but there is a great deal of speculation, and most certainly no solving of any mystery.  Did I mention all the repetition?  

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review 2017-09-26 19:18
Too Young for 6th
6th Grade Ancient History: Dawn of Early Man: Prehistoric Man Encyclopedia Sixth Grade Books (Children's Prehistoric History Books) - Baby Professor

Good information, a good starting place, but too young for 6th grade. 

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review 2017-09-26 19:00
Nice Photos, too Young
6th Grade History: First Civilizations: Ancient Civilizations for Kids Sixth Grade Books (Children's Ancient History Books) - Baby Professor

I feel like a broken record...the book is listed for 6th grade but is definitely good for a younger age. 

 

The photography is very nice and well done, the topic is too light for the age. 

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text 2017-09-21 00:17
More on the Education Shelf
4th Grade History: Ancient Civilizations: Fourth Grade Books for Kids (Children's Ancient History Books) - Baby Professor
4th Grade History Book: Mayans and Incas of South America: Fourth Grade Books Ancient Civilizations (Children's Ancient History Books) - Baby Professor
Socrates: A Stunning Look At Socrates Amazing Philosophies, His Ethics And The Tragic Trial And Death Of Socrates: Socrates Series And Socrates Books (Socrates ... Socrates Apology, Socrates Way,) - Paula Berrigan
Let's Get Charged! (All About Electricity) : 5th Grade Science Series: Fifth Grade Books Electricity for Kids (Children's Physics Books) - Baby Professor
Jaw-Dropping Geography: Fun Learning Fac... Jaw-Dropping Geography: Fun Learning Facts About Volatile Volcanoes: Illustrated Fun Learning For Kids (Volume 1) - Jess Roche

Yes, these books are all on Kindle. Yes, these books were all found and purchased for free. Yes, the ones that list as grade levels have some really nice photography. Yes, they have some really good, but sparse information. They just did very simple information and again I feel that the books are too simple and too easy for the grades listed. 

 

If you have younger kids, these might be good starters. 

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review 2017-03-30 00:40
Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea (Hinges of History #4)
Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter - Thomas Cahill

The foundations of what we call Western culture today seemingly sprung from one place, Greece, yet that is not the entire truth.  Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, the fourth volume of Thomas Cahill’s Hinges of History, examines and explains the structure of Greek society and ideas as well as the reasons why it has permeated so much of what we know of Western culture.  But Cahill’s answer to why the Greeks matter is two-fold.

 

Over the course of 264 pages of text, Cahill looks at all the features of Greek culture that made them so different from other ancient cultures.  Through the study of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Cahill examined the Greek’s view of war and honor in their grand war epic then how the same man expressed how the Greek’s expressed their feelings.  The contradiction of the Homeric works is part of a larger theme that Cahill explores in Greek poetry beyond Homer, politicians and playwrights, philosophers, and artists.  Throughout each chapter, Cahill examines what the Greeks did differently than anyone else as well as relate examples that many will know.  Yet Cahill reveals that as time went on the Greeks own culture started to swallow itself until stabilized by the Romans who were without the Greek imagination and then merged with newly developing Christian religion that used Greek words to explain its beliefs to a wider world; this synthesis of the Greco-Roman world and Judeo-Christian tradition is what created Western thought and society that we know today.

 

Cahill’s analysis and themes are for the general reader very through-provoking, but even for someone not well versed in overall Greek scholarship there seems to be something missing in this book.  Just in comparing previous and upcoming volumes of Cahill’s own series, this book seems really short for one covering one of the two big parts of Western Civilization.  Aside from the two chapters focused around the Homeric epics, all the other chapters seemed to be less than they could be not only in examples but also in giving connections in relevance for the reader today.

 

For the Western society in general, the Greeks are remembered for their myths, magnificent ruins, and democracy.  Thomas Cahill’s Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea does reveal that ancient Greece was more than that and why a culture millennia old matters to us today.  While not perfect, this book is at least a good read for the general reader which may be what Cahill is aiming for but for those more well read it feels lacking once finished.

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