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text 2018-03-09 16:46
Movie Review: Hidden Figures (2016)



Hidden Figures is a positive and inspiring tale about the role three African-American women played in the NASA program.


I LOVED this movie. It had me experience, so many different emotions. These women where amazing. What they did and how they changed the NASA program was spectacular. This story is based on a book, a true story, which I’ve not read, but the movie was superb. The performances where truly exceptional. It’s educational, but entertaining. Affirmative without being preachy and family friendly in a straightforward way.


Hidden Figures is a treasure. Full of heroism and hidden doubts.


Borrowed from my local library! 







I was born and raised in Northern Indiana. I’m an outdoor sun loving reader living near San Fransisco. I’m a mother, wife, dog owner, animal, and book lover. I’m the owner, reviewer, and mind behind Angel’s Guilty Pleasures. My favorite animals are horses & dogs. As for reading I love all things paranormal & urban fantasy. My favorite shifters are dragons!

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Source: angelsguiltypleasures.com/2018/03/movie-review-hidden-figures-2016
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text 2018-03-04 09:24
Fevered with Love's Anxiety: "Phantom Thread" by Paul Thomas Anderson


This movie made think on one of Saint John of the Cross' poems.


At 3am the dragon set forth along the Caparica beach and stared out over the water, lit only with the full moon:


In an obscure night, Fevered with love's anxiety (O hapless, happy plight!), I went, none seeing me, Forth from my cave, where all things quiet be,” said the dragon, to no one in particular. But someone was there, creeping around in the shadows. Arthur, Arthur Scargill the vampire, twiddling his strangely long thumbs.


'Zombies! Zombies everywhere!' Cried the Dragon. 'Quick!' Said Arthur, 'Get in my futuristic looking Ford Sierra. Don't mind Stig he does that.' 'What's that thudding sound?' Said the dragon, 'Don't mind them. That's me killer robots.' Said Arthur as they crashed through some barriers and narrowly missed going over a cliff. 'What am I sitting on?' Said the dragon gloomily. 'That's just big bird.' Said Arthur.


Vampire Arthur Scargill wasn't in the mood for a moody Dragon, and had come to look up to the Beast, through the sunroof, as a source of inspiration. "You just turn that frown upside down, Laddie."


He stopped the car and told the Grumpy Dragon to look behind them; nothing but chaos, dust, and a shed on a tow-rope.

'Go and look in't shed, eh? I've got Mr. Sheen in there.' The Gloomy Dragon flapped his great wings, and whooooosh was half-way out of the sunroof in a second. 



If you're into stuff like this, read on.

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text 2018-03-03 16:45
Borzage Silent: "The Shape of Water" by Guillermo Del Toro



I've been mulling over this film ever since I saw it, and I think the nearest thing I can compare it to are the romantic Borzage silents with Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. The intense romanticism, the gorgeous, swooning imagery, the incredible gentleness of the whole thing. If you already like silent films I think "The Shape of Water" will push all the right buttons. It's not like watching a normal film where you follow a spoken narrative in a very literal sense. You feel the story similar to a ballet, with the same intensity of emotion. Films like this rarely get made anymore. At least not for a mass market.


If you're into movies, read on.

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text 2018-03-02 09:52
Space 1999 Reboot: "Interstellar" by Christopher Nolan


How exactly did "solving gravity" allow them to launch NASA and save all human life? Did they develop some kind of anti-gravity? Isn't that theoretically impossible, no matter how much information of an unspecified nature one gathers from inside black holes? If people in the future are capable of building a device that can send messages through time via gravity, why didn't they just send those messages themselves, instead of waiting for someone from the past to stumble upon the device and use it? Come to that, why set this device to focus on the bedroom of a little girl who might be able to take the information to NASA, and not just focus it on NASA? How come Coop looked about 50 when, according to the film, he was no older than 35 when he left Earth?


Just saying.


If you're into stuff like this, read on.

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text 2018-02-18 09:53
Tickboxing Screen SF: "Altered Carbon" by Laeta Kalogridis


It's a shame they've spent so much money on it as it isn't anything new, the only thing that is new is that you see a couple of willies (even though the willie count is going up generally, we always get an almost embarrassed shot which says look there's a willie in this but lets move back along to the tits, phew) along with the many, many boobs, bums and really as you get closer to the end, stomach churning sexual violence. There is a line spoken by one young actress which made me think that the thirteen year olds watching it (and there will be) will be off kilter for days if not months or years. And of course the scene where one actress fights naked. She seems to be fighting naked because she is a new clone and if she had been born from a vacuum pack I'd have gone with it, but she'd been reclining on a nice comfy chair which could have gone with some nice comfy sci-fi- sweatpants or even a slinky pair of pjs...but no she's naked. Some of the totemic cliches of the first two episodes are part info dump but are mostly faithful to the book. And unless I'm remembering the novel incorrectly, there's at least one Chekov's Gun lying in plain view that had to be there. There is a degree of lingering soft porn that's been overdone (e.g., the Bancroft clone vault scene), and the screenplay and acting are awkward against the expense and complexity of the effects. But I'm four episodes in and so far it's not even close to my expectations. Richard Morgan's novels are heavily invested in violence and sex. They do contrast the violent, casual decadence and immorality of the Meth's vs the street. It's the dark side to privilege that, say, Bank's Culture didn't always address with the same visceral ugliness.



If you're into good SF, don't read on.

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