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review 2018-07-12 10:00
New Release Review! Theirs to Pleasure (The Marriage Lottery #2) Stasia Black!
Theirs to Pleasure - Stasia Black

 

 

In the New Republic, every woman must marry five men.
It’s the law.
Welcome to the apocalypse.

 

Shay came into the township knowing she’d be a lottery bride. So she’d have to marry five men.


She wasn’t the naïve girl she’d been eight years ago.
She’d learned the lessons that had been beaten into her and she’d learned them well.


So yes, so she’d share her body with her new husbands.
But her secrets were still her own.

 

The men are different than she expected, though. They each had their own reasons for entering the lottery. There’s Charlie, who’s so sweet and kind. Rafe, who’s a light-hearted jokester during the day but dark and demanding in bed. Then Jonas and Henry and Gabriel, each bringing their own damage and beauty to the clan until, day by day, they begin to feel like a real family.

 

There’s just one little problem with the happy new family clan.
One of them isn’t who he appears to be.
He is a spy for the enemy.

 

Will Shay and the township be doomed before she and her husbands have a chance at lasting happiness?


Please note that this book contains some dark elements and covers sensitive topics. Any reader that feels they shouldn't venture into this apocalyptic world of sometimes harsh realities should please consider before reading.

 

 

 

The second book in The Marriage Lottery series is a sensual and exciting read that holds readers captive from the very beginning. The story starts off giving a bit of background for how Shay and Charlie met which lets readers know right off the bat that this story is going to be full of thrilling suspense and action. The fast pace ensures that readers never have a dull moment or lose interest in anything that is going on and let me just say that there are lots of exciting events that take place, events that steam the senses, events that hold readers in suspense and events that really get the adrenaline pumping. Shay knew that she would participate in the lottery and have five husbands and while she intends to share her body, she will keep her secrets which certainly keeps readers guessing and on edge. The five men, Charlie, Rafe, Jonas, Gabriel and Henry all have stirring parts in this story as well, but since one of them may or may not be a spy for the enemy, readers are kept on edge no matter how well they get to know them.

 

These strong, captivating characters are brought to vivid life and easily enthrall readers with their story, so much so that surprising twists ensure that the readers can’t determine all the secrets and who is the enemy until the very thrilling reveal. The romance itself is full of super sexy and erotic scenes as well emotional turmoil that adds realism to the story especially since nothing is ever black and white. The story is also quite intense, not only because the emotionally troubled relationship but also due to the conspiracy that these characters find themselves embroiled in.

 

Once again, I was completely taken in by Stasia Black’s story and her well-developed characters and post-apocalyptic world that I had no problem envisioning, so I can’t wait to read the next one.

 


Theirs to Pleasure

 

Goodreads - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40280400-theirs-to-pleasure

 

BookBub - https://www.bookbub.com/books/theirs-to-pleasure-a-reverse-harem-romance-by-stasia-black

 

Theirs to Pleasure is the 2nd book in The Marriage Lottery series -


Goodreads - https://www.goodreads.com/series/234111-the-marriage-lottery

 

author - https://www.stasiablack.com/marriage-lottery-series

 

which includes:


Theirs to Protect #1

 


Theirs to Pleasure is available in ebook at:


Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Theirs-Pleasure-Reverse-Harem-Romance-ebook/dp/B07DG3NGZ1/ref=la_B01MY5PIUH_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1530491785&sr=1-1

 


Stasia was born in Georgia, grew up in Texas, recently spent a freezing five-year stint in Minnesota, and now is happily planted in sunny California, which she will never, ever leave.

 

She loves writing, reading, listening to podcasts, and has recently taken up biking after a twenty-year sabbatical (and has the bumps and bruises to prove it). She lives with her own personal cheerleader, aka, her handsome husband, and their teenage son. Wow. Typing that makes her feel old. And writing about herself in the third person makes her feel a little like a nutjob, but ahem! Where were we?

Stasia’s drawn to romantic stories that don’t take the easy way out. She wants to see beneath people’s veneer and poke into their dark places, their twisted motives, and their deepest desires. Basically, she wants to create characters that make readers alternately laugh, cry ugly tears, want to toss their kindles across the room, and then declare they have a new FBB (forever book boyfriend).

 

 

Be sure & visit Stasia at the following locations:

 

Website - http://www.stasiablack.com/

 

Goodreads - https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16283005.Stasia_Black

 

BookBub - https://www.bookbub.com/authors/stasia-black

 

Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/StasiaBlackAuthor

 

InstaGram - http://www.instagram.com/stasiablackauthor

 

Twitter - http://twitter.com/stasiawritesmut

 

 

 

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review 2018-04-11 10:00
New Release Review! Theirs to Protect by Stasia Black!
Theirs to Protect - Stasia Black

 

 

In a world where there’s only one woman for every twelve men, a lottery is the chance for five lucky men to win the prize of a lifetime… her hand in marriage.

Nix never put his name in the marriage lottery for a reason. 
He doesn’t need a woman. 


There aren’t that many to go around anyway, not after a genetically engineered virus wiped out 90% of the female population. 
He has his job as head of the Security Squadron and it’s all he needs. He looks out for the township. He protects the few women who are left.
But when his name is called to be one of the five husbands to the woman rescued from the badlands, he doesn’t speak up to correct the error.
Because Audrey’s like no one he’s ever met before. 


Fiesty. 

That’s the name for her. 
She might be just the woman to handle a rough, brutal man like him.

Sharing her with four other men is a small price to pay. 
In fact, the closer they all grow, the more Nix realizes he might finally have again what he lost so long ago—a real family.

But when Audrey’s life is endangered, will Nix be able to save the woman he’s just learned how to love?

 

 

 

Theirs to Protect is a thrilling post-apocalyptic read with a super-hot erotic element that packs an emotional punch and kept me glued to the pages from the very beginning.

 

Audrey and her men are strong, compelling characters with lots of sizzling chemistry. Each of the men have different personalities which adds to the difficulties of traversing this complicated relationship especially since the men not only have to convince Audrey to accept their relationship but they have to get used to sharing with each other.  So the romance is a bit rocky with lots of emotional turmoil and problems to overcome which keeps readers guessing as to whether this relationship will reach that ‘happily ever after’ or not.  Of course there is lots of steamy and electrifyingly hot encounters between Audrey and her new husbands that readers might want to keep a bucket of water close by… you know just in case your ereader starts to melt or you have a few hot flashes yourself.

 

This fast paced plot starts off with some sensitive action and proceeds to keep readers glued to the pages and hanging onto the edge of their seats as they deal escape attempts, difficulties of living in a post-apocalyptic world and of course bad guys and the author does a fantastic job of bringing it all to life with vivid imagery which ensures that the readers feel and understand the emotional impact of the story.

 

This is the first book that I have read by this author and I was unable to determine if the author intends to write more stories in this intriguing post-apocalyptic world, but I would certainly want to read them if she does. The story held me captive from the very beginning and I am looking forward to reading more of Stasia Black’s work in the future.

 

 

 

Theirs to Protect is available in ebook at:

Amazon

 

Stasia Black can be found at:

Website   Goodreads   BookBub   Facebook   Instagram   Twitter

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-11-15 14:55
The Einstein Intersection - Samuel R. Delany
The Einstein Intersection - Samuel R. Delany,Neil Gaiman
**Slightly spoilery and full of pretension.**
 
You remember the legend of the Beatles? You remember the Beatle Ringo left his love even though she treated him tender. He was the one Beatle who did not sing, so the earliest forms of the legend go. After a hard day's night he and the rest of the Beatles were torn apart by screaming girls, and he and the other Beatles returned, finally at one, with the great rock and the great roll.
 
Given a long enough time-span, our reality will turn to myth. When we are lucky, what we know about our lives will survive in stories, fuel the imagination of others, being re-lived in the grand tales and the small.
 
There is no death, only love.
 
On the surface, The Einstein Intersection is a quest. Lobey loses his beloved Friza and goes on a journey to wrestle her back from death. He has monsters to fight, cattle to tend to, and underworlds to enter. He has to leave old friends behind, to make new acquaintances and foes. Just like every hero, he has to confront his arch-nemesis, Kid Death, a read-headed child-devil.
 
It's a quest, a coming-of-age story, and a re-enactment of myths. Lobey and the other characters channel mythic figures, more than one at a time. Lobey is Orpheus and Theseus, further we have Minotaurs and oracles, a Cyclops who is also Jesus, the traitor who is every traitor combined, Persephone who is Jean Harlow who is every dream you ever had, and Death who is Billy the Kid who is the Devil. Through re-enacting, Delany confronts our myths and our myth-making. He uses the hero's quest as a rumination about differences and how we come to terms with them. These differences are the heart of the story, as are the contrasts: live and death and the in-between, village and town and city, feral Minotaurs and cattle-like dragons and tame dogs, the old tryst and the lost love and the object of pure desire. Lo and La and Le.
 
There is no death, only rhythm.
 
Delany creates an irrational universe in spellbinding prose. His writing is lyrical; it has rhythm. Poetic descriptions are juxtaposed with action sequences channelling classic pulp, in the best tradition of Alfred Bester (I have been told Delany is a fan).
 
While the prose is beautiful on a sentence to sentence level, and the individual episodes of Lobey's quest are fun to read, they don't connect all that well. I have too little familiarity with ancient myths to say if Delany was trying to imitate them here, or if he was simply making things up as he went along.
 
Each chapter – or rather episode, as there are no real chapter breaks – starts with an epigraph, some of them taken from Delany's own author's journal. That's more than a bit pretentious; but Delany was just in his mid-twenties when he wrote this book, a young author very full of himself (and, to the most part, rightly so); I'm willing to cut him some slack. 
 
There is no death. Only music.
 
Lobey is a musician. His flute is also his machete, an instrument to create and to destroy. It's one example for Delany's surrealist, metaphorical writing. It sometimes reaches obscurity and leaves the reader with an ending that is, just like the author wanted it to be, inconclusive.
 
No answers, but are the questions really that important? Endings can only be inconclusive, because there are no endings. This post-apocalyptic world is peopled with aliens who have taken over humanity's legacy, trying to walk in our shoes. But just like Lobey must transcend his role as Orpheus, earth's new inhabitants must learn to transcend the old myths and go on, making their own stories, to fully become themselves. A new beginning.
 
The appropriate soundtrack here would be the Beatles. But I'm really not that into the Beatles, so I chose the Orpheus tale from someone who is one of the greatest storytellers the great rock and the great roll ever had: The Lyre of Orpheus

 

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review 2017-03-18 15:00
Stone Cold Bastards Review
Stone Cold Bastards - Jake Bible

Forget clawed mutants and moody men of steel. Jake Bible’s Grotesques are the heroes this world needs. Stone Cold Bastards is outright bloody fun. I love zombies, and I’m a fan of the author’s Z-Burbia series, but I think this was much better. It is a gust of fresh air blowing away some of the rancid post-apocalyptic rot pervading the genre.

 

Sometimes you just want to watch the world burn. If you cannot watch it burn, then you at least want to see geysers of blood and rib-cage battering rams. If none of those are available, chocolate will suffice. Luckily for me, I didn’t need to resort to chocolate. Jake Bible’s Stone Cold Bastards gave me all the head-bursting violence my blackened heart could want.

 

It also appealed to the teen in me. The one who discovered the show Gargoyles and sat in front of the TV for hours on end, watching the protectors of New York kick evil guy butt. Though you daren’t call the Stone Cold Bastards anything other than Grotesques, it’s clear there is a resemblance. Living stone attached to a sanctuary are moved halfway across the world to America and take up their positions as guardians.  These herculean heroes of various proportions are a bit cruder and less puppy-doggish than the Gargoyles I knew and loved, but they have an undeniable appeal. Especially the shotgun toting fairies with mouths that would make a sailor blush.

Though Stone Cold Bastards doesn’t exactly hit the ground running, by the time you’re halfway through the book, you’ve forgotten the real world exists. A literary treat that will have you on the edge of your seat, always ready to do a fist pump and cheer the Grotesques on. Morty and company burst to life in your mind’s eye. As tension builds and the violence becomes almost non-stop, it’s impossible to put down.

 

And Bible’s world in Stone Cold Bastards is a scary one. There are no zombies, but instead, there are demons. In this new post-apocalyptic world, the gates of Hell have opened and demons are queuing up to take their turns in the meat bags there were inheriting the earth. But human bodies can’t contain the festering rot of evil for long, and as the book opens, there’s only one Sanctuary of uncorrupted humanity left.  What makes this so scary, though, is that in this world all it takes is eye contact to become possessed. Bible takes something that we take for granted and twists it effortlessly into something with terrifying consequences.

 

By the time I was 30 pages from the end of Stone Cold Bastards, I was grinning like a loon. After it had finished, I went full on fangirl squealing and bugging my book-reviewing compadres to put it on their To-Read list immediately. I haven’t shown so much geekish excitement over a book since I read Andy Weir’s The Martian a few years ago.

 

Even a few days later, I still grin every time I think about the awesomeness that is Stone Cold Bastards. It’s an unashamedly campy, no-holds-barred post-apocalyptic thrill ride that will make you cheer. And maybe do a little Snoopy dance. (Or maybe that’s just me. What can I say? Some gals go gaga for romance, some go nuts for butt-kicking.)

Source: www.scifiandscary.com/stone-cold-bastards-review
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review 2016-08-22 19:30
THE ROAD Review
The Road - Cormac McCarthy

Synopsis: The searing, postapocalyptic novel destined to become Cormac McCarthy's masterpiece.

A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other.

The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, "each the other's world entire," are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation.

 

*****

 

I really didn't know what to expect when going into The Road. I knew it had inspired countless recent apocalyptic novels, and was deemed one of the greatest works of literature of the past few decades. Hell, it was even an Oprah's Book Club selection. I never actively searched out Cormac McCarthy's novels, but upon seeing a hardcover edition of this particular book in my local thrift store, I decided to give it a shot.

 

The most immediately noticeable thing about this novel is its stark minimalism. This is a story that takes place entirely in a ruined Earth, and it's all about an unnamed man and son's long walk south to warmer weather and . . . perhaps, people. McCarthy writes like an heir to Ernest Hemingway; his prose is striking, subdued, and nominal. There are no quotation marks or apostrophes to be found here, which bothered me until I fell into the rhythm of the story the author was trying to tell. I know that bothers many readers — especially the lack of quotation marks thing — but I think it's fitting. It is not always clear who is speaking, which fits perfectly with the style of this somber tale. This is a cold, dead, uninviting world; it's only necessary for the prose to be uninviting as well.

 

The Road is an icy, unforgettable journey — and I'm glad I took it. While it isn't perfect (I felt the first half was pretty slow going, and some of the overly minimal dialogue made things a little confusing at times), it's a book I will probably reread in the years to come. I'm not sure it's totally worthy of all the acclaim it has gotten since its release a decade ago, but I really dug McCarthy's writing style overall and will certainly look into more of his works. It was a totally solid read. Four stars.

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