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Search tags: Poverty
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text 2018-10-04 04:36
Win a e-book edition of East Van Saturday Night on BookLikes

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text 2018-08-18 15:00
Reading progress update: I've read 110 out of 190 pages.
The Solitary Summer - Elizabeth von Arnim

Back to Solitary Summer, and to anybody who thinks this is just fluffy garden talk, I'd heartily recommend to read the section on the disastrous intersection of poverty, prejudice and ignorance in the village, particularly insofar as it concerned the children. 

"There is a great wall of ignorance and prejudice dividing us from the people on our place, and in every effort to help them we knock against it and cannot move it any more than if it were actual stone. Like the parson on the subject of morals, I can talk till I am hoarse on the subject of health, without at any time producing the faintest impression. When things are very bad the doctor is brought, directions are given, medicines made up, and his orders, unless they happen to be approved of, are simply not carried out. Orders to wash a patient and open windows are never obeyed, because the whole village would rise up if, later on, the illness ended in death, and accuse the relatives of murder. "

No wonder Elizabeth's heart broke every time she went there -- especially knowing that any and all attempts at providing real help would be rejected out of deeply inbred prejudice, and being left with this conclusion:

"At least I had discovered Lotte and could help her a little, I thought, as I departed down the garden path between the rows of scarlet-runners; but the help that takes the form of jelly and iced drinks is not of a lasting nature, and I have but little sympathy with a benevolence that finds its highest expression in gifts of the kind. There have been women within my experience who went down into the grave accompanied by special pastoral encomiums, and whose claims to lady- bountifulness, on closer inquiry, rested solely on a foundation of jelly. Yet nothing in the world is easier than ordering jelly to be sent to the sick, except refraining from ordering it. What more, however, could I do for Lotte than this? I could not take her up in my arms and run away with her and nurse her back to health, for she would probably object to such a course as strongly as her mother; and later on, when she gets well again, she will go back to school, and grow coarse and bouncing and leathery like the others, affording the parson, in three or four years' time, a fresh occasion for grief over deadly sin."

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review 2018-01-30 21:37
Luxury cruises, snarky stowaways & human smuggling
Ship Out of Luck - Neal Shusterman

Fun and funny YA that weaves awkward mid-teen shenanigans, poverty, and immigration together in a light yet high-stakes tale that's unfailing entertaining. Great for the younger end of the YA spectrum, with just enough dating angst to make it a bit mature for some MG readers, but none of the explicit content that ages YA up into adult territory.

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quote 2017-11-16 17:13
[Gertrude Stein] thinks Fitzgerald will be read when many of his well known contemporaries are forgotten.
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City - Matthew Desmond

After hearing for the last few years that it took a WWII book program to bring The Great Gatsby into fashion, I think it's pretty awesome that Stein saw Fitzgerald's brilliance back in 1933. 

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quote 2017-08-16 13:47
Here, the streets were so quiet. We were two miles from our old apartment. Easily, I could imagine how quickly a sort of amnesia might kick in; how tempting it would be to let this new silence swaddle us. 'Happiness' does not have to be synonymous with 'complacency' of course. But now I better understood how a person might unconsciously begin to draw the curtains, turning a home into a walled garden. Would we forget about our homeless neighbors if we were no longer living within earshot of one another? If we weren’t literally rubbing shoulders? On our first night in the new house, this seemed like something dangerous to guard against.

Karen Russell, “Looking for Home”
http://lithub.com/looking-for-home-karen-russell-on-americas-housing-catastrophe/

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