logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Psyche
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-11 20:57
4 Out Of 5 "she takes bad mommy to a whole new level" STARS
Lying in Wait - Liz Nugent

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~BOOK BLURB~

Lying In Wait

Liz Nugent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

My husband did not mean to kill Annie Doyle, but the lying tramp deserved it.

 

On the surface, Lydia Fitzsimons has the perfect life—wife of a respected, successful judge, mother to a beloved son, mistress of a beautiful house in Dublin. That beautiful house, however, holds a secret. And when Lydia’s son, Laurence, discovers its secret, wheels are set in motion that lead to an increasingly claustrophobic and devastatingly dark climax.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~MY QUICKIE REVIEW~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

What do they say about that bond between Mothers and their Sons?  Well, whatever it is that they say…this mommy takes it way too far.  Kind of like Norma Bates in Psycho. 

 

The writing or the flow was superb and this was compelling readable even though there were a few things I found lacking in it.  I wanted a bigger reveal with what was really going on.  It was somewhat anti-climatic.  Plus the characters were so glum and the atmosphere and the era was a touch depressing.  The ending…I'm not even sure how I felt about that ending.  I guess it fits with the story…crazy.

 

My cover looks like this...I just didn't feel like changing it on here:

 

 

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

~MY RATING~

4STARS - GRADE=B+

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Plot~ 3.8/5

Main Characters~ 4/5

Secondary Characters~ 4/5

The Feels~ 4/5

Pacing~ 3.8/5

Addictiveness~ 5/5

Theme or Tone~ 3/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 5/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 4.3/5

Originality~ 5/5

Ending~ 3.8/5

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Book Cover~ It's Okay

Publisher~ Gallery, Threshold, Pocket Books Gallery/Scout Press

Setting~ Ireland

Source~  I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-25 14:12
2.5 Out Of 5 STARS for Good Me, Bad Me by Ali Land
Good Me Bad Me - Ali Land

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~ABOUT THE BOOK~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Good Me Bad Me is dark, compelling, voice-driven psychological suspense by debut author Ali Land.

 

How far does the apple really fall from the tree? 

 

Milly's mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her into the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school. 

 

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother's trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all. 

 

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother's daughter.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~MY QUICKIE REVIEW~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Lately, I've been reading genres of books that are out of my comfort zone.  This may have been too far out, though. Because ultimately, I was disturbed and saddened by this story, and I wish I'd never listened to this one at all. 

 

If you like to be inside the head of someone who has been abused mentally and psychically and see all their dark twistiness that comes from that, then the inside of Annie/Millie's head might be a welcome place for you.  It's just not for me, though.

 

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

~MY RATING~

2.5/5 STARS - GRADE=D+

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Plot~ 3/5

Main Characters~ 2.5/5

Secondary Characters~ 2.5/5

The Feels~ 3/5

Pacing~ 3/5

Addictiveness~ 2.5/5

Theme or Tone~ 2/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 3.8/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 3/5

Ending~ 2/5  Cliffhanger~  Not really.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Book Cover~ It's kind of compelling, I wished that it had warned me away, though…

Narration~ by Imogen Church was fairly well done.  She definitely had the creep factor going…

Setting~ London, England

Source~ Audiobook (Library)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-03 16:10
3.8 Out Of 5 Stars for this dark, twisted AF love story...
Our Kind of Cruelty: A Novel - Araminta Hall

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Book Title:  Our Kind of Cruelty

Author:  Araminta Hall

Genre:  Psychological Thriller

Publisher:  Farrar, Straus, and Giroux

Source: I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~The Blurb (which is an excellent summarization for this book)~

This is a love story. Mike’s love story.

Mike Hayes fought his way out of a brutal childhood and into a quiet if lonely life before he met Verity Metcalf. V taught him about love, and in return, Mike has dedicated his life to making her happy. He’s found the perfect home, the perfect job, he’s sculpted himself into the physical ideal V has always wanted. He knows they’ll be blissfully happy together.

It doesn’t matter that she hasn’t been returning his emails or phone calls.

It doesn’t matter that she says she’s marrying Angus.

It’s all just part of the secret game they used to play. If Mike watches V closely, he’ll see the signs. If he keeps track of her every move he’ll know just when to come to her rescue…

A spellbinding, darkly twisted novel about desire and obsession, and the complicated lines between truth and perception, Our Kind of Cruelty introduces Araminta Hall, a chilling new voice in psychological suspense.

 

 

~MY RATING~ 3.8/5 STARS - GRADE=B

 

~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Plot~ 4/5

Main Characters~ 3.5/5

Secondary Characters~ 3.8/5

The Feels~ 5/5

Pacing~ 4/5

Addictiveness~ 5/5

Theme or Tone~4/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 3.8/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 4/5

Originality~ 4.5/5

Ending~ 3.7/5  Cliffhanger~ …sort of open-ended.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Book Cover~ Okay, I guess…

Setting~ London, England

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

~My Thoughts~

 

A compelling, provocative, and utterly disturbing story about obsessive love…with a decidedly English feel (this is coming from an American, though) to it.  Being inside Mike's head is uncomfortable…I really despise stalkers, and he left me feeling positively icky.  It is odd though, that he made me doubt, like seriously doubt, everything.  In fact…I don't know if I truly understood the ending.  Maybe, that's what the Author wants???  But, overall, I was hooked while reading this and had to know where this was ultimately going.  Although, I was slightly mystified with the ending.

 

~Will I read more from this Author?~ I don't really know, honestly.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-24 12:37
Selbstliebe ist harte Arbeit
Bodies: Schlachtfelder der Schönheit - Susie Orbach

Susie Orbach ist eine Koryphäe auf dem Gebiet der Psychoanalyse und der Psychotherapie. Als Expertin für Essstörungen und das enge Verhältnis von Körper und Selbstwertgefühl führt sie seit Jahrzehnten eine Praxis in London, gründete 1976 das „Women’s Therapy Centre“, veröffentlichte mehrere Bücher (darunter der Bestseller „Anti-Diät-Buch“) und behandelte Prinzessin Diana wegen ihrer Bulimie. Sie ist eine engagierte Feministin, die unermüdlich die Prozesse unserer Gesellschaft demaskiert, die unser Körpergefühl zielgerichtet unterminieren, Unsicherheiten bewusst provozieren, aus selbigen profitieren und uns in einen Krieg gegen den eigenen Körper treiben. Sie trug entscheidend zur feministischen Debatte bei, in der das Empfinden von Körperlichkeit heute mehr denn je als essenzieller Faktor für die Entwicklung einer gesunden Persönlichkeit angesehen wird.

 

Absurd unrealistische Schönheitsideale vom klassischen Sixpack bis zur berüchtigten „Thigh Gap“, Essstörungen, Body-Shaming, Fat-Shaming und die vollkommene Fixierung auf oberflächliche Äußerlichkeiten sind längst keine Ammenmärchen des feministischen Untergrunds mehr. Diese und viele weitere körperbezogene Phänomene sind in der Mitte der Gesellschaft angekommen. Sie sind bekannt. Wir sind entsetzt, lesen wir vom Selbstmord eines jungen Mädchens, die von den diskriminierenden Facebook-Kommentaren ihrer Mitschüler_innen bezüglich der Breite ihrer Hüften in den Tod getrieben wurde. Wir schütteln den Kopf, sehen das soziale Netzwerk in der Pflicht, verlangen, dass diese Kommentare strenger kontrolliert werden. Wir regen uns auf – und rennen dann ins Fitnessstudio, um zur „bestmöglichsten Version unserer selbst“ zu werden. Wir treiben Sport bis zur Erschöpfung, wir halten Diät, wir verzichten, nehmen Appetitzügler, kaufen formende Unterwäsche, die unsere Organe einquetscht, verlassen uns auf überteuerte, fragwürdige Pharmazie und Kosmetikartikel und glauben der Industrie jede noch so paradoxe Lüge. Hilft das alles nicht, tritt die Schönheitschirurgie auf den Plan. Schönheit, die theoretisch im Auge des Betrachters liegen sollte, ist ein globales Milliarden-Geschäft.

 

In „Bodies: Schlachtfelder der Schönheit“ untersucht Susie Orbach die Auswirkungen des weltweiten Schönheitswahns und postuliert eine Theorie, inwiefern das zwanghafte Streben nach dem perfekten Körper ihrer Meinung nach ein gestörtes, ungesundes Körpergefühl verursacht. Anhand verschiedener Fallbeispiele und Studienergebnisse zeigt sie die extremen Spielarten des modernen Körperkults, analysiert entwicklungspsychologische Faktoren und hinterfragt Einflüsse und Verantwortlichkeit von Schönheitschirurgie, Werbe-, Diät- und Pharmaindustrie. Sie nennt das Problem mutig beim Namen: Körperhass. Die totale Ablehnung des eigenen, physischen Ichs, dessen Individualität nicht als Stärke, sondern als Makel angesehen wird, den es in aller Konsequenz auszumerzen gilt. Der Körper als Dauerbaustelle.

 

Ich fand „Bodies“ definitiv sehr interessant. Dieses Sachbuch zwingt die Leser_innen nahezu, sich selbst zu hinterfragen und das Verhältnis zum eigenen Körper auf den Prüfstand zu stellen. Ich konnte nicht verhindern, mich zu fragen, warum ich eigentlich Joggen gehe, obwohl mir das Laufen an sich keinen Spaß macht, wieso ich esse, ohne Hunger zu haben und inwieweit mein Blick in den Spiegel von gesellschaftlichen ästhetischen Idealvorstellungen getrübt ist. Wessen Gedanken treiben mich an? Meine eigenen? Oder sind es die Ideen profitorientierter Wirtschaftsunternehmen? Bin ich fähig, mich selbst so zu akzeptieren, wie ich bin? Lebe ich in Frieden mit und in meinem Körper? Bin ich in der Lage, mich selbst „schön“ zu finden? Diese Fragen sind zweifellos unangenehm. Ich kann mir vorstellen, dass es Leser_innen gibt, die Susie Orbachs Ausführungen als Angriff werten und sich in die Defensive gedrängt fühlen, weil sie soziokulturelle Prozesse kritisiert, die uns alle betreffen. Mit dem rasanten Fortschreiten von Globalisierung und Digitalisierung wird es immer schwieriger, sich dem Einfluss einer ganzen Armee von Industriezweigen, die uns vorbeten, wie wir auszusehen und unseren Körper zu behandeln haben, zu entziehen. Treibe Sport, verzichte auf Kohlenhydrate, lass deine Nase richten – tu etwas für dich, denn du trägst die Verantwortung für dein Projekt „Körper“.

 

Laut Orbach werden wir pro Woche schätzungsweise zwischen 2000 und 5000 Mal mit Bildern digital manipulierter, retuschierter Körper konfrontiert. Ich finde das enorm viel und darüber hinaus empörend. Bis zu 5000 Mal wird mir also vor Augen gehalten, wie ich nicht aussehe, niemals aussehen werde und auch gar nicht aussehen kann. Menschen, die sich ausschließlich für mein Geld interessieren, belästigen mich mit unrealistischen Illusionen, die mir ein schlechtes Gewissen einreden sollen. Unsicherheit wird zielgerichtet in meinen Kopf verpflanzt. Das ist unverschämt. Das Schlimme daran ist, dass ich, obwohl ich für diese systematische Manipulation bereits sensibilisiert bin, mich immer wieder bewusst daran erinnern muss, dass ich nicht „falsch“ oder unzureichend bin, nur weil ich nicht einem willkürlich gesetzten Ideal entspreche. Selbstliebe ist harte Arbeit.

 

Orbach sieht jedoch nicht nur äußere Einflüsse als entscheidende Faktoren hinsichtlich der Ausbildung eines gestörten Körpergefühls. „Bodies“ ist kein gift- und gallespuckender, hysterischer Feldzug gegen die Industrie, obwohl die Autorin die Ausbeutung des Körpers und das Verschwinden der Körpervielfalt selbstverständlich anprangert. Sie beleuchtet verschiedene, teilweise interagierende Ursachen und beruft sich auf Studien, die nahelegen, dass das Empfinden von Körperlichkeit bereits im frühesten Kindesalter determiniert wird und maßgeblich von der physischen Interaktion mit den Eltern abhängt. Babys, die eine Form von Vernachlässigung ihrer psychischen Bedürfnisse erleben – werden sie beispielsweise nicht getröstet, wenn sie weinen – modifizieren ihre eigene Psyche und die damit verbundenen Neuralbahnen, um zu gefallen, weil sie annehmen (soweit man in diesem Entwicklungsstadium davon sprechen kann), dass mit ihnen etwas nicht stimmt. Sie stellen die Aspekte ihres Ichs in den Vordergrund, die positive Resonanz erhalten, um ihr Bestreben nach Anerkennung zu befriedigen, während andere Aspekte unterentwickelt bleiben. Ist diese psychische, neurale Struktur erst einmal gefestigt, kann sie sich bis ins Erwachsenenalter fortsetzen, wodurch sich ein fragiles Körpergefühl einstellen kann, da allem misstraut wird, das aus der betreffenden Person selbst kommt.
Ich habe meine Eltern gefragt: soweit sie sich erinnern, haben sie mich als Baby nie schreien lassen.

 

Die Psychotherapeutin berichtet von einer Patientin, die seit ihrer Jugend an wiederkehrender Bulimie litt. Im Laufe der Behandlung stellte sich heraus, dass besagte Patientin nie viel von ihrer Mutter berührt worden war, stattdessen jedoch Gefühle von Trauer, Entsetzen, Schmerz, Scham, Angst und Unsicherheit übermittelt bekam. Sie lebte in einem „falschen“ Körper, in dem sie sich nie ganz wohlfühlte, weil ihre Mutter die Ausbildung ihres „wahren“ Körpers beschnitten hatte.
Dieser Fall ist ein hervorragendes Beispiel dafür, warum „Bodies“ von mir trotz seines höchst informativen Charakters lediglich 4 Sterne erhält. Die Schilderung von Orbachs Beziehung und Interaktion mit dieser Patientin empfand ich als schwer nachvollziehbar, ja beinahe esoterisch. Nun möchte ich ihre Erlebnisse als Therapeutin selbstverständlich nicht in Frage stellen, aber die intensive Bindung zwischen ihnen, in der Orbach die unterschwelligen, unbewussten Gefühle ihrer Patientin, die ihr von ihrer Mutter vermittelt worden waren, körperlich wahrnahm, ist zweifellos schwer zu glauben.

 

Darüber hinaus war mir nicht immer klar, wo genau Susie Orbach die Grenze zwischen Psyche und Körper zieht. Mir erscheint der Übergang fließend und ich könnte nicht determinieren, wann sich ein gestörtes Körpergefühl tatsächlich aus einer gestörten Beziehung zum eigenen Körper speist und wann es Ausdruck eines psychischen Traumas ist. Ich habe ihre Ausführung nicht völlig verstanden, weil sie sich teilweise abstrakt ausdrückt und oft weit ausholt, um einen bestimmten Punkt zu erörtern. Ich bin nicht sicher, ob sie überhaupt einen Unterschied zwischen psychischer und physischer Existenz sieht oder ob diese ihrer Meinung nach nicht zu trennen sind.

 

Nichtsdestotrotz stimme ich ihrer These, dass sich die moderne Auffassung vom Thema Körperlichkeit ändern muss, uneingeschränkt zu. Der Druck, einem bestimmten Ideal entsprechen zu müssen, ist unkontrolliert mutiert und bringt uns in eine Lage, in der wir oft kein Maß mehr finden. Wir sind verunsichert und haben verlernt, die Signale unserer Körper zu deuten. Das Bestreben, äußerlich perfekt zu sein, stürzt uns in ein tiefes psychisches Ungleichgewicht, das uns veranlasst, unsere Körper hyperkritisch zu beurteilen. Wir wollen jede noch so kleine Körperfunktion kontrollieren und können das reine Erleben nicht mehr genießen.

 

Öffentliche Körper-Toleranz ist maximal ein erster Schritt; eine wahrhafte Veränderung kann nur dann ihr Potential entfalten, wenn sie an den Stellen greift, die von unserem instabilen Verhältnis zum Körper profitieren: in der Industrie. Leider habe ich keine Hoffnungen, dass die entsprechenden Industriezweige für das Allgemeinwohl auf haufenweise Geld verzichten. Was bleibt also übrig? Ich denke, die einzige Waffe gegen den Einfluss des globalen Schönheitswahns ist der eigene Geist. Wir müssen bewusst entscheiden, uns so zu akzeptieren, wie wir sind und die Manipulationsversuche zu ignorieren. Damit möchte ich nicht sagen, dass niemand mehr Sport treiben oder eine Schönheitsoperation vornehmen lassen sollte, aber ich halte es für wichtig, eine ganz individuelle Balance zu finden, statt sich in einen Krieg gegen den eigenen Körper drängen zu lassen.

 

Ich habe durch „Bodies: Schlachtfelder der Schönheit“ sehr viel gelernt und ich bin dankbar, dass Menschen wie Susie Orbach versuchen, unser Bewusstsein für den gesellschaftlichen Umgang mit Körperlichkeit zu schärfen. Ich schätze ihre Arbeit sehr und kann dieses Sachbuch guten Gewissens empfehlen.
Abschließend möchte ich nur noch eines sagen: überprüft eure Gedanken, während ihr den Spiegel blickt. Tötet die fiese Stimme, die euch zuflüstert, dass ihr nicht genügt, dass ihr zu dick, zu krumm, zu hässlich seid. Sie lügt.

Source: wortmagieblog.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/susie-orbach-bodies-schlachtfelder-der-schoenheit
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-10 04:28
Alice in the Country of Hearts: My Fanatic Rabbit (manga, vol. 2) story by QuinRose, art by Delico Psyche, scenario by Shinotsuki, translated by Ajino Hirami
Alice in the Country of Hearts: My Fanatic Rabbit, Vol. 2 -

Peter saves Alice from being beheaded by Vivaldi, and Elliot takes Alice back to the mansion. Alice and Elliot are suddenly a lovey dovey couple, but things take a turn for the worse when Alice spends time with Ace and Julius. She learns about the clocks, and that Elliot

was once in prison for irreparably breaking his friend's clock. Elliot gets mad at Alice for being chummy with Julius, the man he hates, so Alice decides that she should drink the vial and go back to her world and her sister. However, Nightmare intervenes with a vision of Elliot killing himself after Alice leaves, so she decides to stay.

(spoiler show)


This started off as a mediocre series, featuring one of my least favorite Alice in the Country of pairings, and then took a turn for the much worse. First we have attempted rape on Elliot's part -

he begins to force himself on Alice in anger after she spends time with Julius, his enemy.

(spoiler show)

Then we have Nightmare's emotional manipulation of her.

Alice was going to leave Wonderland for good, and for a very good reason (a borderline abusive boyfriend). In order to stop her, Nightmare produced a vision of Elliot killing himself out of thin air. It reminded me of the horrible boyfriend a family member of mine used to have, who'd try to get her to stay with him by telling her he'd kill himself if she left.

(spoiler show)


Not only that, the way the story was told was choppy and just plain bad - it went from Elliot taking Alice back to the mansion to them being a couple in the space of a page or so. I also felt that the artwork took a bit of a nosedive, becoming scratchier and less appealing.

If this were a horror series, it'd be one thing, but these stories are supposed to be romances, albeit occasionally kind of dark ones. This was garbage.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?