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text 2020-07-03 20:10
New Release ~ Code Name: Ghost

 

Code Name: Ghost

(Jameson Force Security, Book #5)

Sawyer Bennett

Release Date: June 30, 2020

 

 

 

Synopsis:

 

I knew the risks of this job when I signed on with Jameson Force Security. Knew my time as a marine would prepare me for the danger I would face. But no amount of training could have ever prepared me for the helplessness of watching my teammates die, the agonizing mental and physical pain of torture, or the despair of captivity. Returning home to Pittsburgh following a mission gone wrong, I am riddled with guilt and haunted by nightmares. I spend my days trying to regain the parts of myself I lost in that desert, the pieces that made me the Malik Fournier I once was. While the physical effects of my torture are fading, the emotional ones are proving much more stubborn and I find solace from the last person I should ever seek such comfort. Anna Tate lost even more than I did in that mission. Now a widow and a single mom to the daughter she gave birth to shortly after her husband’s death, Anna offers me comfort I don’t deserve. As my feelings for Anna grow, I worry that once she learns the truth about what happened, she’ll turn her back on me. I pull her to me just as tightly as I push her away. Hoping this forbidden love will save me from the ghost I’ve become.

 

Download Code Name: Ghost:

Amazon | Nook | Apple | Google | Kobo Print

| Audible (narrated by Aaron Shedlock and Virginia Rose)

 

 

About the Author:

 

New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal Bestselling author Sawyer Bennett uses real life experience to create relatable stories that appeal to a wide array of readers. From contemporary romance, fantasy romance, and both women’s and general fiction, Sawyer writes something for just about everyone. A former trial lawyer from North Carolina, when she is not bringing fiction to life, Sawyer is a chauffeur, stylist, chef, maid, and personal assistant to her very adorable daughter, as well as full-time servant to her wonderfully naughty dogs. If you’d like to receive a notification when Sawyer releases a new book, sign up for her newsletter (sawyerbennett.com/signup).

 

Connect with Sawyer:

 

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads | Book + Main Bites | BookBub | Amazon | Newsletter | Master Blogger List

 

 

 

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text 2020-06-30 04:00
Miracles for Veterans Spotlight and GIVEAWAY!
 

About the Book

 


Book:  Miracles for Veterans

Author: Joan Hunter

Genre:  Non-fiction, Christian Living

Release Date: May 15, 2020

Military veterans experience stress and trauma that civilians cannot even begin to imagine. No matter what branch they were in, whether they saw combat or not, their service left an indelible mark on their bodies, hearts, and minds, souls and spirits. Even those who have not suffered external injuries can be affected by post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, anger, and other issues. They need healing on multiple levels.

Joan Hunter tackles all of the problems that veterans face in her new book, Miracles for Veterans. She covers some of the root causes; the positive aspects of service, such as growth and maturity, as well as the negative effects, including physical, emotional, and spiritual injury; and the consequences of service on general and cellular memory. Joan offers guidance to those ministering to veterans, healing prayers, and insights on prevention.

Among the testimonials included in Joan’s book is that of Auston O’Neill, 71, who travels throughout the United States to play “Taps” on his bugle for any deceased veteran whose family requests it as a member of Bugles Across America.

Auston is battling terminal cancer that has spread to his lymph nodes, but his faith is strong. “You know, I believe in God for my healing,” he says. “I’m getting stronger as the days go by. I’m not getting weaker.”

Joan notes God is limitless and His Word is true. He is ever ready to heal us if we only will believe.

Click HERE to get your copy!


About the Author

 


Joan Hunter is a compassionate minister, dynamic teacher, accomplished author, and anointed healing evangelist who has devoted her life to carry a message of hope, deliverance, and healing to the nations. As founder and president of Joan Hunter Ministries, Hearts 4 Him, and 4 Corners Foundation, and pres­ident of Hunter Ministries, Joan has a vision to equip believers to take the healing power of God “beyond the four walls of the church to the four corners of the earth.” Joan’s genuine approach and candid delivery enables her to connect intimately with people from all walks of life. Some describe her as “Carol Burnett with the anointing of Jesus.”

Joan ministers the gospel with manifestations of supernat­ural signs and wonders in healing schools, miracle services, con­ferences, churches, and revival centers around the world. She is sensitive to the move of the Spirit and speaks prophetically to the local body and into the individual lives of those in attendance. Joan’s genuine approach and candid delivery enable her to connect intimately with people from all educational, social, and cultural backgrounds.

At the tender age of twelve, Joan committed her life to Christ and began faithfully serving in ministry alongside her parents, Charles and Frances Hunter, as they traveled around the globe conducting Healing Explosions and Healing Schools until their deaths. Prior to branching out into her own international healing ministry, Joan also co-pastored a church for eighteen years.

Joan brings a powerful ministry to a world characterized by brokenness and pain. Having emerged victorious through tragic circumstances, impossible obstacles, and immeasurable devasta­tion, Joan is able to share a message of hope and restoration to the brokenhearted, deliverance and freedom to the bound, and heal­ing and wholeness to the diseased. Joan’s life is one of uncompro­mising dedication to the gospel of Jesus Christ, as she exhibits a sincere desire to see the body of Christ live in freedom, happiness, wholeness, and financial wellness.

Joan has ministered in countries all over the world and has been featured on Sid Roth’s It’s SupernaturalMy New Day with Drs. Bob and Audrey Meisner, Everlasting Love with Patricia King, and on Marilyn Hickey’s Today with Marilyn and Sarah. Joan hosts a powerful and exciting show of her own, Miracles Happen! Joan’s television appearances have been broadcast around the world on World Harvest Network, Inspiration Network, Daystar, Faith TV, Cornerstone TV, The Church Channel, Total Christian Television, Christian Television Network, Watchmen Broadcasting, and God TV.

She is a noted author whose books include Love Again, Live AgainHealing the Whole Man HandbookHealing the HeartPower to HealSupernatural ProvisionFreedom Beyond Comprehension; and Miracle Maintenance.

Joan and her husband, Kelley, live northwest of Houston, Texas. Together, they have four daughters, four sons, three sons-in-law, and seven grandchildren.


More from Joan

 

God has a plan for your life. Your previous experiences are meant to prepare you for the next chapter of your life. Whether the stress was positive or negative, God can use you! He will use all of you for His pur-pose. He will turn all negative stressful and traumatic experiences into some-thing good.

Please have an open heart and mind as you continue. Some stories in this book may make you cry while others will make you smile. All of this information will prepare you to walk in total victory and help others to do the same. God is always faithful and He hears your heart’s cry. Open your arms to your Father’s love right now and let that love heal you—body, mind, spirit, emotions, and finances.

Believe this is the day for your breakthrough, your victory. Everyone has bad days. Some have bad months, but there is SONshine coming for every-one. Just like a new recruit has to go through basic training or boot camp in order to advance in rank and responsibility, everyone has to do the same in God’s military. Learn the offensive thrust that carries you to the frontlines and through the enemy’s defenses.

Get prepared. Stay prepared. Don’t run away or get trampled on. Don’t be left behind.
Our motto is PUSH: Pray Until Something Happens!

Be on the offensive and go after God. He is the Commander in Chief of these end-time armed forces!
 

Blog Stops

 

Inklings and notions, June 17

Artistic Nobody, June 18 (Spotlight)

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, June 19

Vicky Sluiter, June 20 (Spotlight)

Texas Book-aholic, June 21

Library Lady’s Kid Lit, June 22 (Spotlight)

For Him and My Family, June 23

Tell Tale Book Reviews, June 24 (Spotlight)

deb’s Book Review, June 25

My Devotional Thoughts, June 26 (Spotlight)

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, June 27

Through the Fire Blogs, June 28 (Spotlight)

Happily Managing a Household of Boys, June 29

For the Love of Literature, June 30 (Spotlight)

 
 

Giveaway

 

 
To celebrate her tour, Joan is giving away the grand prize of a $20 Starbucks gift card!!
 
Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.
 

 

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review 2020-06-27 23:54
NIGHTBLOOD by T. Chris Martindale
Nightblood - T. Chris Martindale

3.5/5 stars!

 

This was total 80's, cheesy, horror fun. Uzis and vampires in a small town. There's so many horror tropes involved I don't know where to begin, so I think I'll just leave it at that.

 

My complaints mostly focus on the fact that the book is a bit too long. If you don't take things too seriously, and you enjoy that fun, silly Rambo-like type of horror, than this is for you!

 

 

Recommended!

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review 2020-06-21 18:02
The Saga of Tanya the Evil, Vol. 1: Deus lo Vult (book) by Carlo Zen, illustrations by Shinobu Shinotsuki, translated by Emily Balistrieri and Kevin Steinbach
The Saga of Tanya the Evil, Vol. 1 - Carlo Collodi,Emily Balistrieri,Kevin Steinbach
Note: Due to the way this book handles religion and religious belief, devoutly religious people should probably approach it with caution.
 
The main character of this book used to be a Japanese salaryman (his name is never mentioned). Specifically, he worked in HR and did layoffs. One particularly upset person he'd just laid off pushed him in front of a train, landing the salaryman in front of Being X, aka God. Being X, annoyed at having to deal with yet another unbeliever, decides to put the salaryman in a position where he will be forced to believe in God. And so the salaryman is reborn in a new world, as an infant girl named Tanya. He retains his personality and memories of his former life but is forced to deal with the limitations of Tanya's body. At age 8 Tanya joins the military, and the book covers Tanya's time there from age 9 to 11, as she rises up in the ranks during the start of this world's first world war.
 
Tanya's new world is very similar to Germany just before World War I. In fact, the book begins with a map of Europe, labeled with new country names (except the United States, which is allowed to remain the same for some reason) - Tanya is a soldier for the Empire. Somehow, Tanya's interest in economics (and psychology and history?) and experience in Human Resources translate to "military genius" in this new world.
 
First, a note about pronouns and gender. The salaryman is male, and Tanya is female. The salaryman still thinks of himself as male, even in Tanya's body, but he is also fairly disconnected from Tanya, to the point that it shows in the writing. Although the bulk of the book is from the salaryman's perspective and he occasionally uses first-person pronouns, he often talks about Tanya in the third person, using feminine pronouns, as though she were a separate being. I couldn't find any rhyme or reason for when he'd use "I" vs. "she" - it seemed, at first, to be linked to whether he was talking about physical actions ("she") rather than purely thoughts ("I"), but that wasn't always the case. In the thick of battle, for example, the salaryman tended to use "I," even when describing actions he performed with Tanya's body.
 
Anyway, I bought this because reviews frequently described it as better written than most recent light novels. I'm not sure I'd agree. Yes, Zen clearly did a lot of research, and yes, certain scenes and passages were really good. But like many recent light novel authors, Zen didn't know how to do decent story pacing and got too bogged down in the nitty gritty details of favorite topics at the expense of story and characters. I was more tolerant of Zen's reliance on first-person POV, because it was occasionally fun seeing the disconnect between Tanya's perspective and how other characters perceived her and her actions, but in the latter half of the book it wasn't uncommon for me to not know whose perspective I was dealing with until several paragraphs or even a whole page or two into a scene. Characters' "voices" were just too similar.
 
Then there were the time skips. At two points, the story skipped forward in time about 30 or 40 years, for about 5 pages total. The first time this happened, it seemed to serve the same function as foreshadowing, hinting at something that would be happening soon in the main narrative but doing so via reporters in the future researching the war years after it was over. The second time skip, though...I don't know. Pretty much pointless.
 
I'm not a big military fiction reader, and I don't know much about the World Wars beyond vague memories of having to learn dates and events in high school. I'm not really the intended audience for this book. That said, I've enjoyed jargon-filled military fiction before. Even if I had trouble following the big picture strategies, this could have kept me hooked with its character interactions and individual battles. Unfortunately, I had trouble following the battles, and Zen seemed to want to avoid having characters talk to each other and interact outside of battle, so there wasn't as much human interaction as I might have liked either. It didn't help that the salaryman was an antisocial person who viewed people as objects, literal human resources for him to use as needed.
 
There were parts of this book that hooked me - I enjoyed the scene about the testing and eventual perfection of the Type 95 orb, which veered (unintentionally?) into black comedy, as well as Lergen and Zettour's perspectives on Tanya's actions and behavior and the salaryman's occasional flashes of cynical humor. But there wasn't enough of that, and the parts that I did enjoy could have been executed better.
 
I don't plan to continue this series and don't know that I'm even interested enough in it to watch the anime.
 
Extras:
  • A map of Europe labeled with all the new country names and coded according to their relationships with the Empire
  • A glossy folded sheet with large illustrations on both sides, which includes a timeline of Tanya's life up to age 9
  • A 6-page appendix that explains the interior and exterior lines strategies, with maps, and gives an outline of the history of the war up to the end of this book
  • An afterword by the author
  • Several black-and-white illustrations throughout
  • This may be the first light novel I've read with footnotes

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2020-06-18 18:55
The pre-history of air-to-air combat
To Rule the Winds: The Evolution of the British Fighter Force Through Two World Wars Volume 1: Prelude to Air War - The Years to 1914 - Michael C. Fox

Michael Fox is a retired metallurgist who spent a quarter century working for the British Standards Institution. While most retirees enjoy their golden years by taking up gardening or spending time with their grandchildren, Fox has dedicated his to a much more ambitious goal: writing a multivolume history charting the development of the British fighter force from the beginning of flight through the Second World War. This book represents the first – and to date, the only – volume to appear, providing its readers with a useful account of the British military’s prewar interest in adapting the new technology of heavier-than-air flight to their wartime needs.

 

Fox begins by summarizing the British military’s earliest exploration of the possibilities of flight. In the century before the Wright brothers’ flyer first took to the skies, this meant balloons, which the British Army experimented with over the course of the 19th century. Though balloons were employed in various imperial wars during the later Victorian era, Fox covers these only in passing, focusing instead on the efforts to find offensive applications for a technology that was most usefully employed in observational roles. These unsuccessful efforts were eclipsed after 1903 by the increasing success of heavier-than-air flight, which soon came to dominate British military thinking.

 

The British military’s investigation of the potential applications of airplanes to their needs forms the heart of his book. In this respect Fox delivers more than the book’s subtitle suggests, as he covers how the army (initially through the Royal Engineers, then with the establishment of the Royal Flying Corps) and the Royal Navy developed their air arms generally during the prewar era. While air-to-air combat remained unknown in the wars prior to 1914, here Fox’s focus helps highlight the amount of thinking and experimentation went into aerial warfare. Impractical as it was with the lightly-powered early airplanes, the British nevertheless experimented with arming aircraft and followed closely similar investigations abroad. Thus, while the aerial duels over the Western Front were still a thing of the future, by the time Britain went to war in 1914 the military had already conceptualized many of the elements that would characterize aerial warfare for the next three decades and was working out the consequences of what might follow from it.

 

Generously illustrated and drawing upon a wealth of primary sources, Fox’s book is an excellent overview of the British armed forces’ experimentations with aerial warfare in the years leading up to the First World War. As beneficial as this is as a “pre-history” of air-to-air combat, though, his approach to the subject sometimes glosses over the other roles for aircraft explored by the British army, most importantly its employment in scouting. With air combat a means to enable scouting rather than an end in and of itself – as even the early advocates of aerial combat acknowledged – It deserved greater attention than Fox gives it in his book. Hopefully he will address this in his next volume, which promises a through consideration of the air war on the Western Front. If Fox can combine this analysis with the sort of technical and organizational detail he demonstrates in this book, it will be a considerable contribution to the study of the First World War in the air.

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