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quote 2018-07-09 05:24
“I don’t know why they can’t release me today,” Tony grumbled. “I’m fine.”

“I know, right?” Dex held back a smile. “I mean, I don’t understand how that bullet didn’t bounce off you, what with you being indestructible and all.”
Thick & Thin - Charlie Cochet

 ~~ Thick & Thin by Charlie Cochet

(THIRDS Book #8)

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text 2018-06-02 05:40
May Reading
3 Thirds of a Ghost - Timothy Fuller
Sleepyhead: Narcolepsy, Neuroscience and the Search for a Good Night - Henry Nicholls
The Secret Library - Oliver Tearle
Browse: The World in Bookshops - Henry Hitchings

14 books read this month.

 

This month's relatively low number is a direct reflection of RL distractions, stress and what I hope is a mini-slump.  Things are looking up; here at the house of feathers, fur, and fins we had some medical uncertainty last month, but now have names to hang on everything, and treatment plans in place, so I have high hopes that June will be more SOP, and I can get back to avoiding real life by hanging out in books.  Also, a trip to Uluru next weekend is MUCH anticipated.  There will be camel-riding, an art exhibit and if I'm really lucky, I'll get to see one of these little guys:

 

A thorny devil, and it drinks with its feet. It places them in a puddle and water moves up by capillary action along grooves to the corner of its mouth.  How cool is that??

 

Quick stats (no charts this month):

 

Four 4.5 star books, but no 5 star reads this month.

6 male authors

8 female authors

 

6 mystery

6 non-fiction

1 audiobook

2 re-reads

 

 

 

TBR Project

 

My experiment in TBR reduction:  I can only buy 1 new book for every 2 I read off my TBR piles, tallied monthly.

 

I bought 6 books this month out of my allotted 13.  So I carry 7 books over to add to my 7 books budgeted for June (50% of books read the previous month - May).  Total book buying budget for June:  14 books. 

 

Hope everyone is pleased with their reading for the month - and bring on June!

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quote 2018-05-26 07:30
“You're so cute."

Dex let out a laugh. "And you're such a dork."

"Says the guy who owns Star Wars Lightsaber chopsticks."

"Sushi tastes better when you use the Force."

"You're only strengthening my case.”
Rack & Ruin - Charlie Cochet

― Charlie Cochet, Rack & Ruin

(THIRDS series #3)

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review 2018-05-06 10:10
3 Thirds of a Ghost (Jupiter Jones, #2)
3 Thirds of a Ghost - Timothy Fuller

I think this is one of those books I just stumbled across somewhere (probably Mysterious Books)  that was inexpensive enough, and caught my attention with the title (spoiler alert: not a ghost story).  I'd never heard of Timothy Fuller and I just lost about 2 hours of my life trying to find out something about his career.  I finally found a standard biography on an Italian website (which has been added to the author's bio here on BookLikes, with full source credit), and the following, which I found by, in desperation, trolling images in hopes that I'd find a pic of the "About the author":

 

 

 

Those were the golden days, eh?  When you could be outwardly snarky and a tiny bit sexist in your back-of-the-cover bio and nobody thought anything of it?  Well, the story itself goes a bit further, as one of the main characters, and suspects is a ... wait for it...

 

Chinaman.

 

Yep, fellow golden age mystery lovers, Fuller was a rule breaker.  And maybe just a teensy bit racist, but I can't feel confident about that.  The book has a large satirical streak, is self-referential, and openly acknowledges the trope and stereotype of the Chinaman in mysteries.  So, while I flinch just seeing the word Chinaman, I suspect in the context of this book it's not bigotry on the part of the author, just part of the story's self-referentialism.

 

Now that I've done such a good job of selling it, I do have to say it's worth reading.  It's fun, it's well written, and it's sprinkled with surprising moments of social commentary.  For example:

 

We've just been discussing the public reaction to a murder of this kind. There's bound to be more excitement than sorrow. Quite usual, perhaps, but is it the result of the popularity of mystery fiction? Which came first? Was the public educated to its interest by the mystery story or was the mystery story the result of a public demand for more mysteries?

 

or this rather profound, yet short-sighted view of one of the characters:

 

There won't be a new type of crime and therefore the mystery story is on the way out. There've been three stages of its development. Novelty, a believable realism, and lastly the fad of the puzzle. The novelty couldn't last, realism went out with their mass production, and a mere puzzle can't stand up for long in book form.

 

 

And this take-no-prisoners observation:

 

Obviously Burton and Day had exhausted their talk about Newbury's murder during the course of the evening and until something new developed Jupiter was ready to forget it himself. The ease with which he could put it out of his mind was not surprising to him. If the human ability to forget could cause a second World War it was no trick to abandon a couple of murders.

 

There's a bit of an Edmund Crispin vibe to the writing and setting (albeit in Boston rather than Oxford) although it's not as tongue-in-cheek as Crispin.  It's a slim tome, only 127 pages, but it's a full mystery; any longer, and frankly, I think there'd be problems with pacing.

 

The plotting was superb; not precisely fair-play, but close enough that the reader doesn't feel cheated.  I had not. a. clue.  The ending was fantastic but not unique (although in 1932 it might have been).

 

It turns out that this is the 2nd book in a series centered on Jupiter Jones, the protagonist.  The books are out of print, which is a shame - they're definitely worthy of being amongst the reprinted classics in my opinion (at least, this one is).  Luckily, they seem to be easily and affordably available online as used hardcovers and paperbacks.  I'll be seeking out the rest of the books in the series.  Definitely recommended for the Golden Agers out there.

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review 2017-11-28 03:50
Now
Tried & True - Charlie Cochet

This is book #10, and the final story in the THIRDS series.  This book can be read as a standalone novel, but why miss all the action and fun?  There is another series soon on the horizon.... you won't want to miss that one either!

 

Sloane & Dex are finally tying the knot.  Not before taking care of yet another terrorist problem.  While their team steps up for one more time together of getting the bad guy, the future Daley's have a lot coming at them.  Wedding plans, family, work, secrets, and so much more.

 

Dex is ready to marry the love of his life.  Only there are a just a few more surprises in store for him.  Sloane has no jitters at all, as he is excited to finally have his man be really his. As more of the story unfolds, we get insight as to the next books sure to come.

 

I will be sad to see this series put to bed.  These characters are so much a part of me now as I re-read them over and over.  I was so pleased to get this latest and final edition that gave me so many feels.  This was such an amazing story.  While action packed, this author knows how to tug on my heart as well.  Keep the tissues handy folks - it's a bumpy ride!  I give this book a 5/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

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