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review 2018-05-24 07:33
Death in the Tunnel - Miles Burton

A classic mystery from days gone by. The body of Sir Wilfred Saxonby is discovered on a train, but the carriage was locked, so he must have killed himself, mustn't he? The days when legwork really was legwork, when every little detail had to be worked out with no help from computers or smartphones! I love these old fashioned stories, but perhaps this one was a bit too long winded and complicated. It was a fascinating step back in time but I was quite glad to step forward again to today!

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review 2018-01-27 21:24
Book Review of Lucy and the Tunnel by J S Rumble
Lucy and the Tunnel - J. F. S. Rumble

Lucy's family get taken hostage by her mother's step-cousin's half-sister...
Wow, that was a mouthful!
Using her quick wit Lucy is in the middle of saving the day, but then something goes horribly wrong and she ends up somewhere unexpected.
Will she find her way back?
Will she save her family?
Will her mother's step-cousin's half-sister get her comeuppance?

 

Review 5*

 

This is a fantastic tale about a brave little girl called Lucy.

 

Lucy is a very smart eleven-year-old who, in an attempt to rescue her family from a crazy and greedy lady, finds herself going on a huge adventure when she accidentally falls through a portal and meets a bee-like creature called Dandelion. Whilst attempting to get home she faces many challenges, each one more dangerous or disgusting than she could ever have imagined. Will she ever get home in one piece?

 

As I said above, this is a fantastic chapter book that had me gasping in surprise or laughing at some of the scenes. I am not the intended age for this book, but the author's imagination seems to have no bounds. This is the third chapter book I've read from this author and each book is as different as chalk and cheese, though just as entertaining.

 

This story takes one brave little girl and throws her into some imaginative and creative problems. However, the one character I really felt sorry for was Dandelion. She is the keeper of a tunnel that lost souls find themselves in when they leave one world and get lost when travelling to the after-life. She is serving penance for a terrible mistake she made, but the author doesn't delve too deeply into this aspect, so the reader is not quite sure how serious the mistake was or when Dandelion's penance will end. What the author does do is use her vivid imagination to bring the tunnel that Dandelion calls home to life. The tunnel has several doors to different 'worlds' and each door is as different as the worlds they guard. I loved the nose door and I'm sure the children will too as the method of opening it is rather gross. *shudder*. The eye one brought a tear to my eye, and not in a good way either!

 

This book is ideal for children with short attention spans as it's only 47 pages long and would be ideal as a quick bedtime story. I must admit that I would have loved if the story was longer, but then it wouldn't be a chapter book. Nevertheless, I was sad to reach the end. The story ends satisfactorily and leaves the reader with an impression that there will be many more adventures for Lucy in the future. I can't wait!

 

J.S. Rumble has written an entertaining chapter book that I thoroughly enjoyed. I love her writing style, which is not particularly fast paced though easy enough for children to follow whether reading on their own, or being read to by their parents. The flow is wonderful too. I would definitely consider reading more of her books in the future.

 

I highly recommend this chapter book to young children aged 4-10, and to adults looking for a chapter book to keep their little ones entertained. - Lynn Worton

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review 2018-01-14 15:56
Good
The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life - John le Carré

Le Carre’s book is more a collection of essays that may or may not be true (at least according to his disclaimer).  The essays range from the very personal (about his father) to the funny (about a credit card) to the historic (about Philby).  There are stories about the development of his novels for movies – including stories about Burton and Guinness.  There is a funny bit about Robert Redford.

 

                But Le Carre’s boo isn’t just name dropping, or to be more exact, it’s not about name dropping at all.  In part, Le Carre talks about his thinking, about how he sees things, flaws and all.  And while he doesn’t have the easy-going style of Neil Simon’s memoirs, there is a charm and breeziness to the essays. 

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review 2018-01-06 00:00
The End of the Tunnel
The End of the Tunnel - Paul Capon For some reason, I thought this was a horror story when I decided to read this today. Who knows, maybe the cover?? It definitely didn't shout out to me children's adventure story which is exactly what it is. I kept waiting for something bad to happen or for some monster to attack them in the cave but it never did. Lol
The story was ok but definitely not what I was expecting. The writing style had that amateurish feel to it and the kids conversations also didn't come across as natural to me.

Now I'm going to get my horror fix in for the day - but going to be a little more selective this time around...
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