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review 2018-03-16 15:01
Primitive Mythology - Joseph Campbell

As always with Campbell, what strikes you first is his personality, his passion, his erudition, his joy at using comparisons of ancient religions to show us what they have in common and thus the deepest impulses that made them, their most basic truths, and how these truths may be applied to the creative life.

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review 2018-03-13 01:55
Didn't impress me with this volume, but I still like the concept
Greek Mythology: Beyond Mount Olympus - in60Learning
"It's not by chance what Americans say when in need of a specialized or precise term, that 'the Greeks have the word for it'." -Aikaterini Spanakaki-Kapetanopoulos


Let me start by saying that I still think that the in60Learning project is a great idea and I hope it puts out a lot of material. I just hope that in their rush for quantity, they don't skimp on quality. From the typographical errors to the way this was written, I think that's a real danger.


Still, let's focus on this volume -- they really did go beyond Mount Olympus in their coverage of Greek Mythology, let's look at the contents of this book:
An Overview of Greek Mythology
The Creation
The Gods of Mount Olympus
Other Gods, Spirits and the Stars
The Underworld and Other Beings in Greek Mythology
The Human Race and the Gods
Greek Mythology in Today's World

That's a lot for anyone to tackle in a book much longer than this -- it's a Herculean effort to get that much into a book this small (pun fully intended). But they go for more than an overview of Greek Mythology, they try to suggest some deeper meanings, to tie their topic into philosophical discussions and the like. Some of that worked, some of that seemed like a stretch -- and some fell flat (that last paragraph, in particular, was a complete mess). You've got to admire the effort, though.


Not only did they cover a wide range of topics, but they worked in a lot of detail -- maybe too much in some instances (including the Roman equivalent names at some points felt like they were striving for word count rather than being thorough).


One of the main theses of the book is the impact that Greek Myth had on Western Culture/the English Language, as is seen in the quotation I borrowed above and they utilized to drive home the point. Not only did they prove this point (in case anyone thought it worthy of debating), but they overdid it. At a certain point, the sections along these lines just became lists:

From the Greek god of sleep, Hypnos, is derived the word hypnosis.
From the Greek legend of the King Tantalus, is derived the word tantalize. He was condemned for eternity to stand up to his chin in the middle of a river with a fruit tree above him. Whenever he tried to drink the water, it receded from him, or grab a fruit, it pulled away from him.
From the Greek god of love, Eros, is derived the word erotic.
From the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, is derived the word aphrodisiac. . . .
From the god of fire and blacksmithing, Vulcan (Greek: Hephaestus), is derived the words volcano and vulcanizing.
From the Roman goddess of grain and farming, Ceres (Greek: Demeter), is derived the word cereal.


That goes on for pages (depending how you have your text size set). The facts are good, they're on point, but it's not good reading.


The basic overview of the Olympian myths, the origin of the universe, the war with the Titans, etc. was pretty solid. Nothing remarkable, but decently executed. The writing as a whole, however, didn't impress me -- frequently, but particularly as the authors tried to wrap up each chapter, the writing felt like it was lifted from High School term papers. I don't necessarily think that's a bad thing, but I got the impression that this series was supposed to be better than that.


This one didn't work for me, but I bet there are people out there who will be helped by it. These people didn't check out D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths so many times from 3rd to 6th grade that the library might as well have given me a copy (not counting the other books on the subject I read, reread, bought, etc. at that age) or haven't had kids during the Riordan-era of publishing. Basically, I should've skipped this one, I think. This slim volume took some big swings -- amount of material, range of material, a couple of the "Big Ideas" running through the book, and whiffed on them all (to stick with the metaphor, I do think it caught a piece of a couple of the pitches). A strong effort, but not one that worked for me.

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review 2018-03-11 21:48
Myth and Middle-earth
Myth & Middle-Earth: Exploring the Medieval Legends Behind J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings - Leslie Ellen Jones

I enjoyed this book about how various mythologies and legends were re-used and presented in a new light by J. R. R. Tolkien, especially the section on drowned lands. The Celtic myths of Ireland and Wales were interesting too. There's much more inside for anyone interested in mythology and how Middle-earth reflects these. Recommended!

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review 2018-03-07 18:38
Review: "Gagged" (The Clipped Saga, #3) by Devon McCormack
Gagged - Devon McCormack


~ 2.5 stars ~


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review 2018-03-06 21:24
Book Review of The Lost Chalice (The Relic Seekers Book 3) by Anita Clenney
The Lost Chalice - Anita Clenney

Adrenaline-fueled adventure and epic romance mix seamlessly in the third installment of New York Times bestselling author Anita Clenney’s Relic Seekers series.


Relic hunter and archaeology expert Kendall Morgan has a lot on her mind. After finding the Fountain of Youth—and discovering that Nathan, her handsome billionaire boss, might actually be her long-lost childhood love—she could really use some time to think. Except a two-thousand-year-old Protettori guardian has just teleported into her bathroom, desperate for help.


The Reaper, an ancient and sinister being consumed with finding the world’s most powerful relics, is after the Holy Grail. Now Kendall must use her sixth sense to find it first. With both Nathan and her brooding bodyguard, Jake, by her side, Kendall sets out to find the lost chalice in a dangerous quest that will test her abilities, her heart, and everything she thought she knew.


Review 4*


This is the third book in The Relic Seekers series. I loved it!


Kendall Morgan is a wonderful character. However, I sometimes wanted to shake some sense into her right from the start. She works for a billionaire as a relic finder. She has a special gift that allows her to track down, as well as know things about, the artifacts she procures for her boss. When her boss, Nathan Larraby, asks her to locate four powerful relics, little does she realise the danger she will face or the secrets she will uncover. Nathan's reclusive nemesis known only by the name of Reaper (as in Grim) is also after the artifacts. But Kendall is also fighting her attraction to her co-worker, Jake Stone, and her handsome boss.


This is an urban fantasy romance with a twist. I started reading the story and was instantly hooked. The story is told through the view points of Kendall and Jake for the most part, but as it progressed, other characters, namely Nathan, also has his say.


I found myself on a roller coaster of emotion as the story unfolded. I enjoyed getting to know the characters better and we are introduced to quite a few new ones too.


The story continues from the end of book two and the reader gets to delve deeper into the Protettori and how and when it was established. This means that we also get to find out more about the Guardian, Raphael, and Marco, the keeper of the relics for the Protettori. We also get to know a little more about the Reaper and his relationship to not only the Protettori, but to one of the other characters. There are other surprises that are revealed too.


The story is just as exciting as the first two, and the author brings two myths together - that of the fountain of youth and the chalice once used by Jesus before he was crucified. However, I still found myself wondering about the trio's relationship and growth (or lack) of it into a threesome. There is definite chemistry between the three; Jake and Nathan don't find each other attractive so much, but they both have feelings for Kendall. I could see the potential for a threesome, but the author seems to have shied away from committing them to this type of relationship. Yet. I don't know if the author plans on continuing with this series, but I hope she does as it feels unfinished to me. The ending was left a little ambiguous, which made me feel disappointed as well as hopeful. If this series will not have at least another book written to conclude it, then I will be most aggrieved. I really want to go on another adventure with these three, and to see whether their relationship grows further.


Anita Clenney has written an intriguing paranormal romance full of action and adventure. I love her fast paced writing style and the flow is wonderful. I would definitely consider reading more books by this author in the future, and there is a high probability that I would add her to my favourite authors list too.


Due to scenes of a sexual nature (which are not explicit), as well as some violence, I do not recommend this book to young readers. However, I highly recommend this book if you love paranormal/supernatural romances/romantic suspense/urban fantasy/action/adventure or myths and/or legends genres. - Lynn Worton

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