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Search tags: august-14
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text SPOILER ALERT! 2016-01-27 18:00
I've read 95
Machtkampf: Der 14. Fall für August Häberle (Kriminalromane im GMEINER-Verlag) - Manfred Bomm

ach herrje fängt das tragisch an :(

in einem kleinen dorf oberhalb von geislingen wird ein pfarrer der unzucht verdächtigt, obwohl er schon älteren semesters ist und verheiratet *seufz*

und ein großer geschäftsmann hat vermutlich selbstmord begangen... oder auch nicht...

 

häberle ist zum glück fast von anfang an mit von der partie! :)

noch gibt es zwischen den beiden vorfällen noch keine verbindung, aber wer weiß, ob sich da nicht noch was entwickelt...

 

auf jedenfall das mit dem pfarrer finde ich furchtbar :(

da stecken die oberen gemeindemitglieder dahinter, ganz sicher :(

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text 2015-08-14 17:24
Fabulous Finds Friday: August 14: Pop Culture Essays Edition
The Psychology of Harry Potter: An Unauthorized Examination Of The Boy Who Lived - Neil Mulholland,Robin S. Rosenberg,Wind Goodfriend,Misty Hook,Richard E. Heyman,Danielle M. Provenzano,Karl S. Rosengren,Emily C. Rosengren,Carol Nemeroff,Peter A. Hancock,Michelle K. Gardner,Nancy Franklin,Susan Engel,Jessica Leigh Murakami,E. David Klon
Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale - James B. South,William Irwin
Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside - Courtland Lewis,Paula Smithka,Mark Wardecker
Finding Serenity: Anti-Heroes, Lost Shepherds and Space Hookers in Joss Whedon's Firefly - Glenn Yeffeth,Jane Espenson
Seven Seasons of Buffy: Science Fiction and Fantasy Authors Discuss Their Favorite Television Show (Smart Pop series) -
Watchmen and Philosophy: A Rorschach Test - Mark D. White,William Irwin,Christopher Robichaud,Jacob M. Held,Anthony Spanakos,Joseph Keeping,J. Robert Loftis,James DiGiovanna,Christopher M. Drohan,Robert Arp,Aaron Meskin
The World of the Golden Compass: The Otherworldly Ride Continues - Scott Westerfeld,Maureen Johnson,Diana Peterfreund,Elizabeth Wein,O.R. Melling
Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts - David Baggett,Shawn E. Klein

One of my favorite sub-genres is the pop culture essay collection, especially collections about favorite book series and television shows. I recently bought a copy of one of my favorites, Mapping the World of Harry Potter, and realized that it was actually produced by an imprint that specializes in just these sorts of things, called Smart Pop books, a division of small publisher BenBella Books. Out of curiosity, I went to their site...and ended up adding at least 10 books to my TBR. But I also stopped in at my local used bookstore- and found some of them for fifty cents apiece (free, if you take into account I used store credit instead of cash)! Of course, they aren't the only publisher in the genre-- Open Court also does those popular titles that incorporate philosophy into pop culture (The Simpsons and Philosophy, Harry Potter and Philosophy, etc) which I've enjoyed immensely and have started collecting. And I'm sure I've grabbed some others from other publishers I haven't bothered to research.

 

This Fab Finds Friday is a bit different, in that I'm combining things I found at the used bookstore this week with books I've rediscovered on my own shelves.

 

I'm hoping to get my hands on ones about Supernatural and Narnia soon, as well as Batman.

 

If anyone has some good suggestions for ones I should look out for, please let me know!

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review 2014-08-18 13:59
August reads: The History of Sexuality #1, Michel Foucault
The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction - Michel Foucault,Robert Hurley

Even if the title, "The History of Sexuality", would suggest a regular exploration of the customs, traditions and concepts regarding sexuality during the course of centuries - and it would have been interesting anyway - actually Foucault proposes a different study from the beginning. Given that he has always been interested in the matter of power, he dusts off the duo sexuality-repression.
In fact, excluding the last decades, believing that society armed itself for silencing the sexuality is a common belief. But Foucault doesn't share the same opinion. The theory he tries to explain is that Western society has always encouraged an exploration of our senses, it is definitely opposite to the idea that it wanted to give of itself, that is an impeding role. Ours is a sexual esploration through the confession: for example in the Counter-Reformation the Church demanded that sins were recounted with a detailed precision, then in the last passed century the psycoanalysis, with Freud who suggested even that in order to understand our true nature relying to our sexuality is extremeley and abnormously necessary. Like it happens with many taboos, sexuality has been blown out of proportion from the shadows around it and the power with capillary branches which has pushed for talking about it always more, instead of silencing it as we believe.

 

The thesis is acute but, although the essay is only of 150 pages, it manages to be very repetitive. It almost seems that Foucault has secured those two basic concepts and often he strings the paragraph out repeating the basic concept. The effect is hammering, surely it's impossible that the key points don't get into one's head at the end. Besides the chapter about the law connected to power seemed to fall into the rambling and redudant, given that the basic idea has already ben expressed in the first paragraphs. I'm not used to read this genre, my philosophical studies in High School were not directly on the author's texts but on textbooks. And my textbook was really good at explaining some concepts that now that I have time to read directly by the same philosophers would have sounded..definitely garbled. I guess it's a matter of getting used to them.
My textbook used to repeat the explained concepts to complete the theory explained, but now doing it so frequently is not necessary..I've not forgotten what you said two pages ago, Foucault!

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video 2014-08-17 11:55
Alberto Sordi. L'Italia in bianco e nero - Goffredo Fofi

Reading progress update: I've read 68 out of 275 pages.

Italian pills: 

 

Alberto Sordi is a well-known Italian actor from the "movies era" of the great Italian comedy (1950-70 approximately). When it was still good, not cheap, vulgar and spent like now. He was also in the first works of Federico Fellini (one of my favorite directors), "The White Sheik" and "I Vitelloni".

What a coincidence: the author has quoted a  little television performance which I saw some days ago in a program, Techetecheté. It is a sort of brief recycling themed playlist of the Italian television. Because yes, our main channel is always remembering the Golden Era instead of modernizing itself and inventing something new. 

I have not found a brief extract from the performance but the entire song (Carcerato), which clearly is useless to post here. He makes a lot of Italian references and it's a bit difficult to translate in English because the song is rhymed. But in the performance he hugs at the beginning Mina. Maybe you already know her. Truth to be told, I don't know if she is well-known out of Italy. Here she's an immortal singer. She has an amazing voice, if some of you are interested in foreign music you should definitely search some of her songs on Youtube. I love this one, Città vuota means Empty City.

Here the translation:

 

The streets are overcrowded, the crowd is around me,

It is talking to me and laughing
And nothing knows about you...
I see passersby around me
But I know, the city will seem to me empty
If you don't come back.

There is that one who wants to be next to me every evening
But I don't care if he gives me his kisses,
I always think about you, only about you
And I know, the city will seem to me empty
If you don't come back.

How do you want to live alone, without me?
Don't you feel that our love is not over yet?

Come back to me, my love,
And the city will not be empty any more.

The streets are overcrowded, the crowd is around me,
It is talking to me and laughing
And nothing knows about you...
I see passersby around me
But I know, the city will seem to me empty
If you don't come back.

How do you want to live alone, without me?
Don't you feel that our love is not over yet?

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review 2014-08-14 12:16
August reads: The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes
The Sense of an Ending - Julian Barnes

How often do we tell our own life story? How often do we adjust, embellish, make sly cuts? And the longer life goes on, the fewer are those around to challenge our account, to remind us that our life is not our life, merely the story we have told about our life. Told to others, but—mainly—to ourselves.

 

Tony Webster, an average exponent of the human race, looks back on all his life in order to understand what was really going on not only with himself, but regarding above all the others. The narration is sometimes lucid, sometimes uncertain, unreliable like every distant memory could be remembered and lightly transmuted, even if only in the details. The first part is the flashback: the times in high school when he met a significant person in his life, Adrian Finn, an incredibly smart boy who defined the history as "that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation" when asked by his professor, when Webster could only give legendary answers heard from others and not entirely believable even for him, just to say something without being dull; the times of college with his girlfriend, Veronica, whose bookshelf is full of Auden, T.S. Eliot, MacNiece, Stevie Smith and others. But there's a difference: Tony knows that Veronica's books are consumed for her readings, while his books are consumed only because he has bought them in a second-hand bookstore, leaving them there in order to read them one day or another. And then, the free months after college and the "mature" age with her wife, Margaret. These two last parenthesys are brief, because Tony's doubts and question are concentrated on Adrian and Veronica, who will come back violently in his life when a letter will pop up in Tony's mailbox. 

 

The themes of the novel are so eloquent that it is impossible to not stop and think of all the intellectual provocations about life and time. In what measure can we be different from the Average Man, Tony Webster? there was the possibilty to not feel the mature age as a silent deception, if compared to the paths of glory of teenage years, when the future was a promise and larger and greater than the past years? At the end, I believe that most of what happen to us is deserved. Particulary our deceptions, which are the result of our choices. But sometimes this is a tough statement to accept, so memory will forge our past, will neglect those details which will not match with our dramatic romance. And like I said, the more I read the novel, the more it turned into a subte journey throught the forgotten details. And this tale about reconstructing the truth is engrossing, at the end totally unpredictable. Its characters have those opacities of not truly known persons and fill Tony's life with the unpleasant stains of a realistic middle life. Actually it's such a realistic representation that it got under my skin. A tracing paper on the second and third layers of life. I definitely will read more by Julian Barnes. 

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